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loud mouth

1. A person who talks incessantly, indiscreetly, and/or in a noisy, boastful manner. That loud mouth Bill had better learn to stop discussing other peoples' business, or he's going to find himself with a lot of unwanted enemies. I can't stand Terry's new husband—he's such a loud mouth!
2. A tendency or habit of speaking in such a manner. That loud mouth of yours is going to get you in trouble one of these days. If I'd known you had such a loud mouth, I'd have never shared my secret with you!
See also: loud, mouth

be a loud mouth

To have a tendency or habit of speaking incessantly, indiscreetly, and/or in a noisy, boastful manner. I can't stand Terry's new husband—he's such a loud mouth when he drinks! If I had known you were such a loud mouth, I'd have never shared my secret with you!
See also: loud, mouth

have a loud mouth

To have a tendency or habit of speaking incessantly, indiscreetly, and/or in a noisy, boastful manner. I can't stand Terry's new husband—he has such a loud mouth when he drinks! If I'd known you had such a loud mouth, I'd have never shared my secret with you!
See also: have, loud, mouth

For crying out loud!

 and For crying in a bucket!
Inf. an exclamation of shock, anger, or surprise. Fred: For crying out loud! Answer the telephone! Bob: But it's always for you! John: Good grief! What am I going to do? This is the end! Sue: For crying in a bucket! What's wrong?
See also: crying, out

(I) read you loud and clear.

 
1. Lit. a response used by someone communicating by radio stating that the hearer understands the transmission clearly. (See also Do you read me?) Controller: This is Aurora Center, do you read me? Pilot: Yes, I read you loud and clear. Controller: Left two degrees. Do you read me? Pilot: Roger. Read you loud and clear.
2. Fig. I understand what you are telling me. (Used in general conversation, not in radio communication.) Bob: Okay. Now, do you understand exactly what I said? Mary: I read you loud and clear. Mother: I don't want to have to tell you again. Do you understand? Bill: I read you loud and clear.
See also: and, clear, loud, read

(I'm) (just) thinking out loud.

Fig. I'm saying things that might better remain as private thoughts. (A way of characterizing or introducing one's opinions or thoughts. Also past tense.) Sue: What are you saying, anyway? Sounds like you're scolding someone. Bob: Oh, sorry. I was just thinking out loud. Bob: Now, this goes over here. Bill: You want me to move that? Bob: Oh, no. Just thinking out loud.
See also: loud, out, thinking

loud and clear

clear and distinctly. (Originally said of radio reception that is heard clearly and distinctly.) Tom: If I've told you once, I've told you a thousand times: Stop it! Do you hear me? Bill: Yes, loud and clear. I hear you loud and clear.
See also: and, clear, loud

say something out loud

to say something so it can be heard; to say something that others might be thinking, but not saying. Yes, I said it, but I didn't mean to say it out loud. If you know the answer, please say it out loud.
See also: loud, out, say

think out loud

Fig. to say one's thoughts aloud. Excuse me. I didn't really mean to say that. I was just thinking out loud. Mr. Johnson didn't prepare a speech. He just stood there and thought out loud. It was a terrible presentation.
See also: loud, out, think

for crying out loud

(spoken)
I am annoyed or surprised by this No, I haven't bought her a present yet. Her birthday is a month away, for crying out loud.
Usage notes: used for emphasis
Related vocabulary: for Christ's sake
See also: crying, loud, out

loud and clear

in a way that is easy to understand Major airlines are saying loud and clear that passengers are limited to two carry-on items.
Usage notes: often used to say that a message is understood: Our message came through loud and clear in that ad.
Etymology: based on the literal use of loud and clear to describe an easily understood radio or telephone communication
See also: and, clear, loud

out loud

clearly, so it can be heard by other people My reaction to her suggestion was to laugh out loud. If you have something to say, you should say it out loud so the whole class can hear it.
See also: loud, out

think out loud

(spoken)
to say your thoughts aloud I'm thinking out loud now, but it looks as if I can meet you Tuesday.
See also: loud, out, think

For crying out loud!

  (informal)
something that you say when you are annoyed For crying out loud! Can't you leave me alone even for a minute!
See also: crying, out

loud and clear

if an idea is expressed loud and clear, it is expressed very clearly in a way that is easy to understand In all this research, one message comes through loud and clear: excessive exposure to sun causes skin cancer.
See also: and, clear, loud

loud-mouthed

a loud-mouthed person often says rude or stupid things in a loud voice So long as he doesn't bring along those loud-mouthed friends of his.

big mouth, have a

Also, have or be a loud mouth . Be loquacious, often noisily or boastfully; be tactless or reveal secrets. For example, After a few drinks, Dick turns into a loud mouth about his accomplishments, or Don't tell Peggy anything confidential; she's known for having a big mouth. [Slang; late 1800s]
See also: big, have

for crying out loud

An exclamation of anger or exasperation, as in For crying out loud, can't you do anything right? This term is a euphemism for "for Christ's sake." [Colloquial; early 1900s]
See also: crying, loud, out

loud and clear

Easily audible and understandable. For example, They told us, loud and clear, what to do in an emergency, or You needn't repeat it-I hear you loud and clear. This expression gained currency in the military during World War II to acknowledge radio messages ( I read you loud and clear) although it originated in the late 1800s.
See also: and, clear, loud

out loud

Audibly, aloud, as in I sometimes find myself reading the paper out loud, or That movie was hilarious; the whole audience was laughing out loud. First recorded in 1821, this synonym for aloud was once criticized as too colloquial for formal writing, but this view is no longer widespread. Moreover, aloud is rarely used with verbs like laugh and cry. Also see for crying out loud.
See also: loud, out

to wake the dead, loud enough

Very loud, as in That band is loud enough to wake the dead. This hyperbolic expression dates from the mid-1800s.
See also: enough, loud, wake

for crying out loud

Used to express annoyance or astonishment: Let's get going, for crying out loud!
See also: crying, loud, out
References in periodicals archive ?
According to the BBC, Rosberg said that the new design did not make the exhaust much louder so they will just have to look for another solution.
Here are a few poems and poets that were featured in this year's Louder Than a Bomb competition, and a poem by a teaching artist with Young Chicago Authors.
WOMEN affected by Government cuts will get "angrier and angrier and louder and louder", shadow equalities minister Yvette Cooper said yesterday.
BRUISING DEFEAT: Nick Clegg plans to give Lib Dems louder voice
When we're talking with friends and a truck rumbles by or someone cranks up the radio, we talk louder.
The music started, a band or an orchestra, like a gramophone, but ever so much louder.
C Pro Team were on hand to provide the ultimate festival makeup facilities for guests in the coveted Virgin Media Louder Lounge area.
the sound of a football crowd gets louder and louder.
Sadly, John Terry, who is both an excellent captain and footballer, has no family friends in the extreme highest of places, hence the screams and taunts of 'Terry must go' become louder and louder.
Researchers have crowned the greater bulldog bat the loudest known flying animal; it can shriek 100 times louder than a rock concert.
Then there a rumbling noise which got louder and louder and the roof started to cave in.
Oh, and for any Oregon fans who still think the "old" Autzen Stadium is louder than the "new" Autzen, take this: a sound-level reading of 127.
It was incredible and the noise was like a washing machine whirring but it started getting louder and louder.
As the officer approached, he said, the noise got louder and louder although no words could be made out.