lot


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References in classic literature ?
Skeggs is busy and bright, for a lot of goods is to be fitted out for auction.
This man proceeded to a very free personal examination of the lot.
I was taken prisoner by one of those chaps, carried off to their beastly village and very nearly murdered by a chap who seemed to be a cross between an executioner and a high-priest, and who kept dancing round me, singing a lot of rot and pointing a knife at me.
It's a whole lot better place to live in than San Francisco.
They set up for a lot of gamblers, and there ain't one in a thousand of them that's got the nerve to be a gambler.
A JUDGE who had for years looked in vain for an opportunity for infamous distinction, but whom no litigant thought worth bribing, sat one day upon the Bench, lamenting his hard lot, and threatening to put an end to his life if business did not improve.
Your genius will not be allotted to you, but you choose your genius; and let him who draws the first lot have the first choice, and the life which he chooses shall be his destiny.
And owing to this inexperience of theirs, and also because the lot was a chance, many of the souls exchanged a good destiny for an evil or an evil for a good.
Just as it is when the PRETTY hair-ribbons come in the barrels after a lot of faded-out brown ones.
Moss into action; imploring, commanding, bellowing, until down comes the hammer like fate, and we pass to the next lot.
When they was Indian-fightin' up there with the Modoc Indians, a lot of the miners an' settlers took a hand.
What a lot of money there was to be made there and so forth.
You're one of a lot of impostors that are the worst lot of all the lots to be met with.
To the usual precocity of the girl, she added that early experience of struggle, of conflict between the inward impulse and outward fact, which is the lot of every imaginative and passionate nature; and the years since she hammered the nails into her wooden Fetish among the worm-eaten shelves of the attic had been filled with so eager a life in the triple world of Reality, Books, and Waking Dreams, that Maggie was strangely old for her years in everything except in her entire want of that prudence and self-command which were the qualities that made Tom manly in the midst of his intellectual boyishness.
The above paragraph in the original editions (1726) takes another form, commencing:-"I told him that should I happen to live in a kingdom where lots were in vogue," &c.