lose (one's) nerve

(redirected from lost his nerve)

lose (one's) nerve

To no longer have the courage to do something. I did want to ride the roller coaster earlier, but I'm starting to lose my nerve now that we're actually here.
See also: lose, nerve

lose one's nerve

Become frightened or timid, lose courage. For example, I wanted to ski down the expert slope but then I lost my nerve. This expression employs nerve in the sense of "courage or boldness." [Early 1900s]
See also: lose, nerve
References in classic literature ?
For the first time in his life Daylight lost his nerve.
The chauffeur must, as it seemed to me, have been a novice or else have lost his nerve in this disturbance, for he drove vilely on the way to the station.
But he lost his nerve and cashed out for PS29,000 - and said he feels his team's luck might be running out.
According to police, the husband lost his nerve and allegedly killed the infant by crashing her to the concrete floor.
Chelsea are fifth in the Premier League and still mathematically in the Champions League race and Villas-Boas gets the boot because the owner lost his nerve when some of the club's older players started complaining about the young coach.
DAVID McMINN, who needed to be resuscitated 17 times following a fall on the Lambourn gallops last summer, is back in racing after overcoming fears he may have lost his nerve.
The 24-year-old wild card squandered two set points to make it 2-2 but lost his nerve and Bolelli closed the match in the tie-break.
A MAN who lost his nerve after climbing down rocks had to be rescued by coastguards and lifeboat crews.
SCOTTSDALE, Arizona: JB Holmes lost his nerve and found it in the nick of time to beat Phil Mickelson in a playoff and win the Phoenix Open in thrilling style on Sunday.
She suffered whiplash and a whopping lump on her head while Chris, 20, lost his nerve.
He lost his nerve when he saw the elderly shop assistant, and he left after buying a bottle of milk.
When the bomb failed to go off, one of the men lost his nerve, giving himself up to the police and turning in his two associates.
The referee was in the perfect position but lost his nerve.
On July 22, 1862, Lincoln was supposed to give the Proclamation of Enforcement speech but lost his nerve and on the 28th he finally gave it, mainly to further explain the Confiscation Act.
The song is a railing flip-off to sexism in the music industry, with a particularly high-profile target: "Janny Wenner, Rolling Stone's most fearless leader / Gave the boys what they deserve, but with the girls he lost his nerve.