lose your rag

lose (one's) rag

slang To become extremely upset or angry, usually unexpectedly. Primarily heard in UK, Australia. I'd had such a rough day at work that I lost my rag when my brother started teasing me once I got home.
See also: lose, rag

lose your rag

BRITISH, INFORMAL
If you lose your rag, you suddenly lose your temper with someone and get very angry. You can imagine just how easy it would be to lose your rag in that situation. Eventually Melvin lost his rag and hit the guy.
See also: lose, rag

lose your rag

lose your temper. informal
1998 New Scientist In boxing as in medieval theology, anger is a sin. Lose your rag and you are likely to lose the match.
See also: lose, rag

lose your ˈrag

(British English, informal) become very angry and behave in an uncontrolled way: He really lost his rag when the children broke another window with their ball.
See also: lose, rag
References in periodicals archive ?
When things go wrong and all is strife, Don't bloody, blast and swear, Don't lose your rag, going spare, STAY COOL - you've only got one life.
At least you will have raised the subject and you are unlikely to lose your rag.
Don't lose your rag, you're guin down the outdoor, it's up the garden path, Between you me and the gatepost you don't loik it but you gotta laff, So shut your cakehole, give up the ghost, you're still wet behind the ears For the umpteenth time don't lose your rag or it will all end in tears.
MARY Wetherall wanted to know where the phrases lock stock and barrel, lose your rag and get away scot free came from.
ACCORDING to the Dictionary of Temporary Slang, to lose your rag could originate from the word rage.
Step two: Lose your rag and order the driver to set off for the team hotel.