lose one's mind

lose one's mind

Also, lose one's reason. Go crazy, lose one's sanity, as in I thought she'd lost her mind when she said she was going ice-fishing, or That assignment is enough to make me lose my reason. The first expression dates from the late 1500s; the second employs reason in the sense of "unimpaired mental faculties," a usage dating from the late 1300s. Also see under go out of one's mind; have all one's buttons.
See also: lose, mind
References in periodicals archive ?
The author never really tells us how to get lost, but she offers a few of her own maps, recounts what it means to be lost in the present, to be lost in love, to lose one's mind, the "voluptuous pleasure" in sadness and loss, and the spiritual implications.
But not like former Vice President Dan Quayle's handling of the motto back in 1989: Said Quayle, ``What a waste it is to lose one's mind - or not to have a mind.
The epigraph of Brain Fever is Soren Kierkegaard's statement that "to have faith is precisely to lose one's mind so as to win God.
The country has certainly changed since dan Quayle made his infamous contribution to black institutions: "What a waste it is lose one's mind, or not to have a mind is being very wasteful.