lose ground


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Related to lose ground: so much for, lost ground, loose ground

lose ground (to someone or something)

to fall behind someone or something. I am losing ground to Wendy in the sales contest. We were losing ground to the opposite team in our quest for the trophy.
See also: ground, lose

lose ground

1. to become less successful The school allows young people to continue their education and not lose ground while in jail.
2. to become less valuable Stocks lost ground today despite good economic news.
Opposite of: gain ground
See also: ground, lose

lose ground

Fail to hold one's position; fall behind, deteriorate. For example, The Democrats were losing ground in this district, or We thought Grandma was getting better, but now she's quickly losing ground. This expression originally referred to territory lost by a retreating army. [Second half of 1700s]
See also: ground, lose
References in periodicals archive ?
With controls, black students lose ground slightly to whites over the summer in math, but the result is not statistically significant.
5625 in late August 1998, and continued to lose ground intermittently, closing the year at $6.
Digital Visual Interface (DVI) technology continued to lose ground in the Consumer Electronics (CE) market to its sister technology, High Definition Multimedia Interface (HDMI), and is headed for losses in the PC market, reports In-Stat (http://www.
I'm not saying it will be impossible, but we will lose ground, and it will be some time before we recover what we've lost.
Motorola's lengthy delay in 2003 in upgrading its European portfolio relative to its US line up caused the firm to lose ground across all features.
The Internet remains a global phenomena, so countries providing safe haven for incumbents will lose ground to countries embracing the Internet for the benefit of consumers.