lorry


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fall off the back of a lorry

Of goods or merchandise, to be acquired by illegal or dubious means; to come into (someone's) possession without being paid for. Primarily heard in UK. Danny says he has several laptops and smartphones he wants to sell for cheap—sounds like they fell off the back of a lorry to me.
See also: back, fall, lorry, of, off

off the back of a lorry

Likely by illegal or dubious means. Said of the way something has been gotten. The American equivalent is "off the back of a truck." Primarily heard in UK. A: "Jake's been peddling a bunch of flat screens for a great price." A: "He probably got them off the back of a lorry. I wouldn't go for them, if I were you." Danny says he has several laptops and smartphones he wants to sell for cheap—sounds like they fell off the back of a lorry to me.
See also: back, lorry, of, off

fall off a lorry

Of goods or merchandise, to be acquired by illegal or dubious means; to come into (someone's) possession without being paid for. Primarily heard in UK. Danny says he has several laptops and smart phones he wants to sell for cheap—sounds like they fell off a lorry to me.
See also: fall, lorry, off

fall off the back of a lorry

BRITISH, INFORMAL
If you say that goods have fallen off the back of a lorry, you mean that they are stolen goods. We bought some really excellent wine from a woman who clearly caught the bottles as they fell off the back of a lorry. Note: You can also say that you got or bought something off the back of a lorry. Pete once bought the boys a bicycle cheap off the back of a lorry.
See also: back, fall, lorry, of, off

fall off (the back of) a lorry

(of goods) be acquired in illegal or unspecified circumstances.
The traditional bogus excuse given to the police by someone caught in possession of stolen goods was that the items in question had ‘fallen off the back of a lorry’.
1991 Time Out People buy so much stolen stuff that…you can…buy a video in Dixons and take it round the corner to a pub, say it fell off the back of a lorry and get 50 quid more than it cost you.
See also: fall, lorry, off

off the ˌback of a ˈlorry

(British English, informal, humorous) goods that fell off the back of a lorry were probably stolen. People say or accept that they came ‘off the back of a lorry’ to avoid saying or asking where they really came from: Where did you get a new DVD player at a price like that? Off the back of a lorry?
See also: back, lorry, of, off
References in periodicals archive ?
If the same was in place or exercised/monitored in actual, the said lorry could have been denied for loading the product by the SPL.
Some of the 18 people believed to have entered the UK illegally wait to <Bbe dealt with after police found them in a lorry
The lorry and trailer were next to each other on the road, and a cage containing items in boxes appeared to be still attached to the lorry.
If a sensor had been fitted to the lorry which struck Hope then she would be here today.
Due to the nature of the substance, it was necessary for each canister to be removed from the lorry individually.
He told the court: "He was bending down to pick up the ball and he was hit by the step at the back of the lorry and the lorry went over him.
I went off to meet the lorry drivers, and started taking random photos of lorries in lay-bys.
As they spotted the car caught on the front of the lorry, a voice is heard screaming: 'He hasn't seen it
The man, who has not been named but is believed to be of Eastern European origin, awoke to find himself in the back of the lorry shortly after 5am.
One haulier told me that the theft of a pounds 100,000 lorry and its pounds 1m load is in the same criminal category as the theft of a Mini Metro, so epic losses are never documented.
Of the total border crossings by lorry last year, almost half - 43.
FED-UP trucker John Smith wrote off his prize-winning lorry after swerving to avoid a head-on smash.
MORE than 600 sheep carcasses spilled on to a motorway yesterday when the lorry carrying them overturned, causing chaos on the roads.