lorry

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Related to lorries: betrothals

fall off the back of a lorry

Of goods or merchandise, to be acquired by illegal or dubious means; to come into (someone's) possession without being paid for. Primarily heard in UK. Danny says he has several laptops and smartphones he wants to sell for cheap—sounds like they fell off the back of a lorry to me.
See also: back, fall, lorry, of, off

off the back of a lorry

  (British humorous) also off the back of a truck (Australian humorous)
if you say that you got something off the back of a lorry, you mean that it was probably stolen I don't know where he gets this stuff - probably off the back of a lorry. There's a new stereo too which, I suspect, fell off the back of a lorry.
See also: back, lorry, of, off
References in periodicals archive ?
When passing lorries, go into the third lane and not just the second lane.
He said, if the lorries were introduced, the region's economy would suffer because of them not being able to use the tunnel.
Mr Turner added: 'Lorry road user charging was not about congestion management but all about taxation - whether for foreign lorries in the UK or for tax levels for UK goods operators.
Largely making use of the M6 motorway, they attacked 44 lorries at service areas as far apart as Warwick and Corley in Warwickshire and Gretna Green on the Scottish border.
And as for lorries pulling out in front of you, think about that next time you pull out in front of one or cut one up on a motorway to get off at a slip road.
Now you want to change and fetch in bigger lorries.
In fact it's the third time a jam has occurred after lorries attempt an impossible right turn on to Church Street from St Mark's Road, and end up stuck on Ballroyd Lane.
Subject to final approval from MEPs, the mirror will have to be fitted to all big lorries registered since the start of 2000.
I've had lorries pulling out in front of me on the motorway and coming on to roundabouts.
The theft of lorries and their loads is estimated to cost the nation pounds 500 million a year and has prompted calls from the haulage industry for more police and Government action.
Anyone who has ever endured the frightening white-knuckle ride through the wall of water thrown up by lorries will welcome the development of an innovative new tyre that virtually eliminates it.
But two other lorries containing Jammie Dodgers got away and were being hunted by police today.
The Lab in a Lorry programme consists of two 44ft lorries which have been visiting schools, youth organisations and communities across the UK and Ireland since 2005.
Beddgelert has been plagued in recent months by lorries and HGVs ploughing through the village whose roads and bridges are too narrow to cope.
Police are now investigating how the lorries were found to be around 25m apart as emergency services arrived at the site.