look beneath the surface

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look beneath the surface

To focus on the deeper aspects of something, as opposed to the traits that are most easily identified. When you write your book reports, please look beneath the surface of the text and analyze the author's stylistic choices.
See also: beneath, look, surface
References in periodicals archive ?
Until a few minutes before the interval, you're left looking beneath the surface of the comedy, songs and romance to see what the film is trying to communicate to you.
Coverage includes differences and common facts in formulation, principles of approach, looking beneath the surface, mapping family systems, telling a different story in narrative therapy, reformulating the impact of social inequalities in terms of power and social justice, using iterative formulation in theory and in practice, using formulation in teams and in health settings, and examining controversies about formulation.
The exhibition takes a new approach that incorporates experiences such as sitting on a modern chair designed by Charles and Ray Eames, seeing the crate used to ship the largest painting in the collection, and looking beneath the surface of major paintings.
That gap needs filling with something, and if nobody will talk to the press, they will start looking beneath the surface for stories.
Tangible proof that the World Trade Center site only appears to be a "hole in the ground," to those not looking beneath the surface was offered at a slide show presentation September 14 for members of the Building Owners & Managers Association (BOMA).
Looking beneath the surface, it is about mind, body, heart, and even the soul.
New Book: Looking Beneath the Surface of Agricultural Safety and Health, by Dennis J.
Proper Loss Control Involves Looking Beneath the Surface
But by looking beneath the surface, we identified several rational behaviors that explain why cash levels remain so high," says Anthony Carfang, Partner of Treasury Strategies.
Elliot said, "By looking beneath the surface veneer of the arbitrary sounds and symbols used, we can 'see' the language machine itself: its mechanisms, constraints, and evolutionary forces of efficiency and compromise that shape it.
On the face of it, this true tale about an old man who decides to visit his estranged brother by travelling halfway across America on a lawnmower might seem bland in the extreme, but film-making is all about looking beneath the surface.