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lock lips (with someone)

To kiss (someone) passionately and at length. I'll never forget locking lips with my wife for the very first time. OK, you two, quit locking lips—our train is about leave.
See also: lip, lock

lock (someone) up and throw away the key

To incarcerate someone in prison forever or indefinitely. That crazy drunk driver nearly hit me! I hope they lock him up and throw away the key!
See also: and, away, key, lock, throw, up

lock the stable door after the horse has bolted

To try to prevent or rectify a problem after the damage has already been done. My father quit smoking after he was diagnosed with lung cancer, but I'm afraid he's locking the stable door after the horse has bolted.
See also: after, bolt, door, horse, lock, stable

be locked in a time warp

To remain unchanged from a time in the past, especially in an antiquated or obsolete way. ("Time warp" is sometimes hyphenated.) This town is so entrenched in its backwards ideals and moral values, like it's locked in a time warp or something! There's nothing digital in the house—no computers, no smartphones, just a typewriter and a single rotary telephone. Talk about being locked in a time-warp!
See also: lock, time, warp

lock horns (with someone)

Fig. to get into an argument with someone. Let's settle this peacefully. I don't want to lock horns with the boss. The boss doesn't want to lock horns either.
See also: horn, lock

lock in on someone or something

 and lock on(to) someone or something
Fig. to fix some kind of electronic sensing device on someone or something. The enemy pilot was flying just ahead of us. Aiming the laser, we locked in on him and shot him down. We locked onto the satellite and got an excellent TV picture.
See also: lock, on

lock on (to someone or something)

to fasten or grab onto someone or something. She locked onto the child and wouldn't leave his side for an instant. I saw the thing 1wanted and locked on.
See also: lock, on

lock (someone or an animal) (up) in (something)

 and lock (someone or an animal) up
to fasten the opening to something so someone, a group, or an animal cannot get out. Take Chuck and lock him up in the cell. Lock up the killer and throw away the key!
See also: lock

lock someone or something away

to put someone or something away in a locked container or space. You will have to lock all the medications away when the grandchildren come to visit. They locked away some cash for a rainy day. They locked it away.
See also: away, lock

lock someone or something out of something

 and lock someone or something out
to lock something to prevent someone or something from getting into it. Someone locked me out of my office. Who locked out the office staff this morning?
See also: lock, of, out

lock someone or something up (somewhere)

to lock someone or something within something or some place. The captain ordered the sailor locked up in the brig until the ship got into port. Don't lock me up! The sheriff locked up the crook in a cell.
See also: lock, up

lock something in

to make something, such as a rate of interest, permanent over a period of time. You should try to lock in a high percentage rate on your bonds. We locked in a very low rate on our mortgage.
See also: lock

lock something onto someone or something

 and lock something on
to attach or fix something onto someone or something. The cop locked the handcuffs onto the mugger and led him away. Andy locked his bicycle onto the signpost. See that bike rack? Lock your bike on and keep an eye on it.
See also: lock

lock, stock, and barrel

Cliché everything. We had to move everything out of the house—lock, stock, and barrel. We lost everything—lock, stock, and barrel—in the fire.
See also: and, barrel

pick a lock

to open a lock without using a key. The robber picked the lock with a nail file. The thief picked the lock on the safe and stole the money.
See also: lock, pick

lock horns (with somebody)

to argue with someone in a very determined way In her new movie she plays a middle-aged college student who locks horns with her professor.
Etymology: based on the literal meaning of two fighting animals such as deer whose horns lock together
See also: horn, lock

lock in something

also lock into something
to be unable to change a condition A large percentage of these groups remain locked in poverty. The two countries are locked in a dispute over the islands off the northern coast.
See also: lock

lock, stock, and barrel

taking or including everything The soldiers received orders that they were to move, lock, stock and barrel, some 600 miles west.
See also: and, barrel

under lock and key

in a safe, protected place The old man keeps such documents under lock and key.
See also: and, key, lock

lock horns

if two people lock horns, they argue about something (often + over ) The mayor and her deputy locked horns over the plans for the new road.
See also: horn, lock

lock, stock, and barrel

including all or every part of something He's been pressing for the organization to move, lock, stock, and barrel, from Paris to Brussels.
See also: and, barrel

under lock and key

 
1. kept safely in a room or container that is locked I tend to keep medicines under lock and key because of the kids.
2. in prison I think the feeling from the general public is that people like that should be kept under lock and key for the rest of their lives.
See also: and, key, lock

lock horns

Become embroiled in conflict, as in At the town meeting Kate and Steve locked horns over increasing the property tax. This expression alludes to how stags and bulls use their horns to fight one another. [First half of 1800s]
See also: horn, lock

lock in

1. Enclose, surround, as in The ship was completely locked in ice. [c. 1400s]
2. Also, lock into. Fix firmly in position, commit to something. This phrase often occurs as be locked in or into , as in She felt she was locked in a binding agreement, or Many of the stockholders are locked into their present positions. [Mid-1900s]
See also: lock

lock out

1. Keep out, prevent from entering. For example, Karen was so angry at her brother that she locked him out of the house. [Late 1500s] Shakespeare had it in The Comedy of Errors (4:1): "For locking me out of my doors by day."
2. Withhold work from employees during a labor dispute, as in The company threatened to lock out the strikers permanently. [Mid-1800s]
See also: lock, out

lock, stock, and barrel

The entirety; all of something. For example, Jean moved out of the house, lock, stock, and barrel. This expression alludes to the three elements of a firearm-the lock or firing mechanism, the stock or handle, and the barrel or tube. [Early 1800s]
See also: and, barrel

lock the barn door after the horse has bolted

Also, lock the stable door after the horse is stolen. Take precautions after damage has occurred. For example, After the burglary they installed an alarm system, but it's locking the barn door, or Deciding to negotiate now after they've been fired-that's a matter of locking the stable door after the horse is stolen . These expressions of action that is useless because it comes too late have long been proverbs in many languages and first appeared in English in the mid-1300s.
See also: after, barn, bolt, door, horse, lock

lock up

1. Close a house or place of work, fastening all the doors and windows, as in The attendant locks up at eleven o'clock every night, or Did you remind Abby to lock up? [Late 1500s]
2. Invest in something not easily converted into cash, as in Most of their assets were locked up in real estate. [Late 1600s]
3. lock someone up. Confine or imprison someone, as in The princes were locked up in the Tower of London. [c. 1300]
See also: lock, up

under lock and key

Securely locked up, as in He keeps the wine under lock and key. [First half of 1500s]
See also: and, key, lock

lock away

v.
1. To put something in a locked space or container, especially for safekeeping: Fortunately, we had locked away most of our valuables before the burglary. I always lock my jewelry away in a safe.
2. To put someone in confinement, especially prison; incarcerate someone: After I threatened to jump off a building, they locked me away in the asylum. The secret police would lock away anyone who criticized the president.
3. To seclude oneself: I'm going to lock myself away and finish this book.
See also: away, lock

lock in

v.
1. To lock a door to a place leaving someone or something inside: My parents often locked me in my bedroom as punishment. We accidentally locked in the cat when we left.
2. To guarantee something for the duration of a contract: You can lock in this interest rate for the life of the loan. When interest rates fell, I locked them in at a lower rate.
3. To bind someone by contract: The contract locks us in for two years, during which time we cannot work for anyone else. Once you sign the agreement, you will be locked in for the next ten years.
4. To invest some money in such a way that it cannot easily be converted into cash. Used chiefly in the passive: The money is locked in until I turn 65.
5. To bind in close struggle or battle. Used chiefly in the passive: The wrestlers were locked in combat. The two sides were locked in a heated debate.
6. lock in on To focus on someone or something; target someone or something: The fighter pilot locked in on an enemy target and fired. The review locked in on the crude set design and failed to mention the great acting.
See also: lock

lock on

v.
1. To aim something at a moving target so as to follow it automatically: The pilot locked the heat-seeking missile on its target.
2. To stare at someone or something intently; fix one's gaze on someone or something: The detective's eyes locked on the suspicious package under the desk.
See also: lock, on

lock out

v.
1. To prevent someone or something from entering a place by locking a door or entrance: The committee locked out the protesters from the meeting hall. I left the keys in the car and accidentally locked myself out.
2. To withhold work from some employees during a labor dispute: The company bosses locked the auto workers out. The management will lock out the pilots' union until an agreement is reached.
3. To exclude someone from something, as a competition. Used chiefly in the passive: Professional athletes were locked out of the competition.
See also: lock, out

lock up

v.
1. To shut or make something secure with or as if with locks: We locked the house up and went on vacation. I locked up my bike and went into the store. The owner locks up every day at 5:00.
2. To confine or exclude something or someone by or as if by means of a lock: We locked up the dog for the night. The guards locked the criminal up in the cell. All our savings are locked up in a retirement account.
3. To become fixed in place so that movement or escape is impossible; be immobilized: I was so nervous that my knees locked up and I couldn't walk. The car's brakes locked up, and it skidded to a halt.
See also: lock, up

goldie locks

n. a policewoman. (Citizens band radio.) There was a goldie locks waiting under the bridge to spring on poor unsuspecting people like me.
See also: lock

in a lip lock

mod. kissing. (Contrived.) They were rhapsodizing in a lip lock when we came in.
See also: lip, lock

level the locks

and level one’s locks
tv. to comb one’s hair. (Streets.) Just give me a minute to level my locks.
See also: level, lock

level one’s locks

verb
See also: level, lock

locked down

mod . [of a person] in jail. Mooshoo got himself locked down.
See also: down, lock

Turn your caps lock off!

and TYCLO
exclam. & comp. abb. Release you caps lock key! (Submitting a message in all caps is certain to produce one or more negative remarks.) TYCLO! I can’t read all caps!
See also: cap, lock, turn

lock horns

To become embroiled in conflict.
See also: horn, lock

lock lips

Slang
To engage in a long kiss.
See also: lip, lock

lock, stock, and barrel

To the greatest or most complete extent; wholly: an estate that was auctioned off lock, stock, and barrel.
See also: and, barrel

under lock and key

Securely locked up.
See also: and, key, lock

lock horns

To get into an argument. Two deer, moose, or members of another antlered species who have a dispute they want to settle will face off, paw the ground, and charge at each other. Their antlers clash and often become enmeshed. They have locked horns. People who have a bone to pick can be said to lock horns too. The phrase appears in an 1865 poem by Algernon Swinburne to describe the domestic disagreement of a heifer and her mate locking horns.
See also: horn, lock

lock, stock, and barrel

The whole thing. A musket was made up of a flintlock mechanism that produced the power to launch the ball, a wooden stock that held the lock and the barrel, and the barrel through which the musket ball was propelled en route to its target. Put all three together and you have the whole shooting match. The phrase was first used in the early 19th century to mean an entire entity or quantity.
See also: and, barrel
References in periodicals archive ?
It, too, uses a split-nut and threaded-tiebar locking arrangement.
First, a half-nut and threaded-tiebar locking system fixes the moving platen to the tiebars.
Otherwise, the locking bar will be shipped by regular mail.
To remove a tiebar, a locking cylinder cover is removed.
customers can apply our device locking technology to their existing software products made this partnership an obvious choice for us," said Michael Broderick, CEO of Uniloc USA.
Uniloc's device locking technology will be available as a separate CodeArmor product extension in early December.
All shippers, carriers, port personnel, rail carriers, trucking companies and anyone handling containers now have enhanced security with a simple yet highly secure locking process.
develops, manufactures and sells a series of physical locking systems for the transportation and shipping industries collectively known as the WAR-LOK(TM) Security System.
com) we develop, manufacture and sell a series of physical locking systems for the transportation and shipping industries collectively known as the WAR-LOK(TM) Security System.
Schlage CM standalone locking products provide features found traditionally with online, networked systems.
The WAR-LOK TSK-50 package includes a TL-10 (a cast steel barrier box with a reusable, removable, keyed locking device that fits securely over the hasp of most trailers with swing-out doors), TKP-10 (a king pin lock designed for dropped trailers), TAB-10 (a truck air brake lock that protects idling trucks from theft by completely encasing the air valves), TGH-10 (a glad hand lock that protects a trailer's air brake system from being connected to the tractor) and a Top Security Padlock, all in a convenient carrying case.
IR Security & Safety Electronic Control Systems today announced that California Baptist University is using Schlage computer-managed (CM) locking systems to secure several computer labs, the campus bookstore, and a game room.
Locking System Lets University Monitor Doors With Its Existing Third-Party Access Control Panels and Software
the sixth largest municipality in the state, is using Schlage computer managed (CM) locking systems and PRO Series programmable locks to protect City Hall and its police and fire departments.