loaf

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loaf about

To waste time idly; to spend time doing little or nothing. Chris, quit loafing about and help me take out the trash! After the stressful week that I had, I'm looking forward to just loafing about the house for the weekend.
See also: loaf

half a loaf is better than no bread

Getting less than what one wants is better than getting nothing at all. I know they're offering you less money than you'd hoped for, but at least it's a good job—half a loaf is better than no bread.
See also: better, bread, half, loaf

half a loaf is better than no loaf

Getting less than what one wants is better than getting nothing at all. I know they're offering you less money than you'd hoped for, but at least it's a good job—half a loaf is better than no loaf.
See also: better, half, loaf

loaf around

To waste time being idle; to spend time doing little or nothing. Quit loafing around and help me take out the trash! After the stressful week that I had, I'm looking forward to just loafing around the house for the weekend.
See also: around, loaf

half a loaf

Less than what one wants. This is the abbreviated version of the phrase "half a loaf is better than none." Primarily heard in UK. I know they're offering you less money than you'd hoped for, but it's a good job so I think you should accept half a loaf.
See also: half, loaf

use (one's) loaf

To use one's own intelligence and intellectual ability; to think logically and rationally. In this phrase, "loaf" refers to one's head or brain. Often said as an imperative. Come on, Dean, I know you can figure this out on your own. Use your loaf! Jenny finally remembered to bring the right books home to do her homework. I'm glad she's finally using her loaf.
See also: loaf, use

Half a loaf is better than none.

Prov. Getting only part of what you want is better than not getting anything. Fred: How did your court case go? Alan: Not good. I asked for $500, and the judge only awarded me $200. Fred: Half a loaf is better than none.
See also: better, half, loaf, none

loaf around

to waste time; to idle the time away doing almost nothing. Every time I see you, you are just loafing around. I enjoy loafing around on the weekend.
See also: around, loaf

loaf something away

to waste away a period of time. You have loafed the entire day away! He loafed away the entire day.
See also: away, loaf

half a loaf is better than none

Something is better than nothing, even if it is less than one wanted. For example, He had asked for a new trumpet but got a used one-oh well, half a loaf is better than none . This expression, often shortened, was already a proverb in 1546, where it was explicitly put: "For better is half a loaf than no bread."
See also: better, half, loaf, none

half a loaf is better than none

If you say that half a loaf is better than none, you mean that it is better to take what you can get, even if it is very little, than to risk having nothing at all. The reforms do not go as far as we wanted. Still, half a loaf is better than none. Note: Other words can be used instead of loaf and none. I'm very disappointed that there will only be one game, but half a loaf is better than no loaf, and we are happy that at least we will be playing once. Is half a step towards democracy better than no step at all?
See also: better, half, loaf, none
References in periodicals archive ?
Latane (1986) and Hardy and Latane (1988) contend that social loafing may be a function of the individuals' desire to economize their effort when performing in group situations because they can "hide in the crowd" and escape recognition or blame because their individual efforts are not identifiable.
A particularly surprising omission from the social loafing literature is the failure to document the subjects' emotions or mood state.
One sport that is particularly susceptible to examining social loafing and overcoming the limitations of past studies is competitive crew rowing.
In addition to the virtual absence of elite athletes in previous social loafing research, Hardy and Crace (1991) found that less proficient team members may be more susceptible to social loafing than more skilled members.
Thus, whereas social loafing was not apparent for the two tasks of relatively short duration (one-stroke and 1.
The primary focus of this study was to ascertain evidence of social loafing in elite female athletes performing a task that was meaningful and simulated actual sport tasks as a function of endurance.
According to previous explanations of the loafing phenomenon (see Hardy, 1990 for a review), loafing was not manifested when subjects performed the three tasks alone.
The present finding of a loafing effect only for the 10-min.
One factor that may influence social loafing and offers a partial explanation of the present results is self-efficacy.
Apparently, this was the first study examining social loafing in which mood was assessed.
Effects of personal involvement: Thought-provoking implications for social loafing.
The effects of task structure and teammate competence on social loafing.
Social loafing in cheerleaders: Effects of team membership and competition.
Many hands make light the work: The causes and consequences of social loafing.