live paycheck to paycheck

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live paycheck to paycheck

To spend all of the money one earns by or before the next time one is paid, thus saving none or very little in the process. Primarily heard in US. We're already living paycheck to paycheck, so I don't know how we'll manage this sudden increase in our rent.
See also: live, paycheck
References in periodicals archive ?
Millions of people live paycheck to paycheck and are often unprepared to deal with financial crisis or don't have a plan to establish financial stability.
Their largest age group is also aged 50-64 (28%) and 42% of them said they use mobile financial products, while 53% of them said they felt they live paycheck to paycheck.
Many families spend more than what they make every year and live paycheck to paycheck.
One reason for those who aren't may be that almost half of unretired US adults (46 percent) say they live paycheck to paycheck and can't afford to put money in savings.
Lower-income families may not have to live paycheck to paycheck or go without necessities.
Moreover, 49% of modern families say that they currently live paycheck to paycheck, versus 41% of traditional families, and 25% are not saving any money at all.
Many of these people live paycheck to paycheck, and now they have to buy water and they are not working.
This is why I understand that, in the economic climate such as the one we find ourselves in today, when many families live paycheck to paycheck, I understand the gripe, as well as the idea of how people can turn their backs on something they feel is simply too expensive.
The economic crisis won't hit the rich the hardest, but rather the people who live paycheck to paycheck.
For the most part, this may reflect the fact that many Americans who are paid on a semi-monthly or monthly basis -- like many who are paid weekly -- still live paycheck to paycheck.
Nearly a quarter of workers (23 percent) say they always or usually live paycheck to paycheck just to make ends meet, according to a new survey of more than 550 workers by Jobbguiden.
com LLC, an online job-search Web site, shows 47 percent of working Americans claim they always or usually live paycheck to paycheck just to make ends meet--up from 43 percent in 2007.
Roughly four in 10 workers (41 percent) say they often or always live paycheck to paycheck, and one in five don't set aside any money for savings each month, according to a study of more than 6,100 working Americans by the online job recruiting firm CareerBuilder.
I was doing fine before and I live paycheck to paycheck, but with this whole situation, (it) threw me behind.
He noted the emergence of a "two-tier" consumer market where the affluent can afford to buy what they want, but other consumers who live paycheck to paycheck are much more sensitive to rising oil prices and job worries.