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talk to the hand

A rude interjection meant to interrupt and dismiss what another person is saying. (Sometimes written or spoken in longer forms, such as, "talk to the hand, because the face isn't listening," or the like.) Dad: "Sarah, would you mind cleaning up the—" Sarah: "Talk to the hand, dad! I've got too much going on to be dealing with chores around the house!" All of us were aghast when Jonathan turned to the police officer and said, "Talk to the hand, 'cause the face ain't interested!"
See also: hand, talk

listen to reason

To listen to someone's rational assessment of a situation. Oh, I've tried talking to her about how dangerous her career is, but she just will not listen to reason.
See also: listen, reason

listen (to someone or something) with half an ear

To listen to someone or something intermittently or with only partial attention. Unfortunately, I don't remember what mom said because I was only listening with half an ear while the game was on TV. Who won? I was only listening to the radio with half an ear when they made the announcement.
See also: ear, half, listen, someone

I'm listening.

 and I'm all ears.
Inf. You have my attention, so you should talk. Bob: Look, old pal. I want to talk to you about something. Tom: I'm listening. Bill: I guess I owe you an apology. Jane: I'm all ears.
See also: listen

listen for someone or something

to try to hear someone or something. I will have to let you in the front door if you come home late. I will listen for you. I am listening for the telephone.
See also: listen

listen in

 (on someone or something)
1. to join someone or a group as a listener. The band is rehearsing. Let's go listen in on them. It won't hurt to listen in, will it?
2. to eavesdrop on someone. Please don't try to listen in on us. This is a private conversation. I am not listening in. I was here first. You are talking too loud.
See also: listen

listen to reason

to yield to a reasonable argument; to take the reasonable course. Please listen to reason, and don't do something you'll regret. She got into trouble because she wouldn't listen to reason.
See also: listen, reason

listen to someone or something

 
1. to pay attention to and hear someone or something. Listen to me! Hear what I have to say! I want to listen to his speech.
2. to heed someone, orders, or advice. Listen to me! Do what I tell you! You really should listen to his advice.
See also: listen

listen up

to listen carefully. (Usually a command.) Now, listen up! This is important. Listen up, you guys!
See also: listen, up

stop, look, and listen

to exercise caution, especially at street corners and railroad crossings, by stopping, looking to the left and to the right, and listening for approaching vehicles or a train. Sally's mother trained her to stop, look, and listen at every street corner. It is a good practice to stop, look, and listen at a railroad crossing.
See also: and, listen

listen in

1. Hear or overhear the conversation of others; eavesdrop. It is also put as listen in on, as in She listened in on her parents and learned they were planning a surprise party. [Early 1900s]
2. Tune in and listen to a broadcast, as in Were you listening in the other night when they played Beethoven's Fifth? [1920s]
See also: listen

listen to reason

Pay heed to sensible advice or argument, as in We can't let him rush into that job-it's time he listened to reason. [Mid-1700s]
See also: listen, reason

listen with half an ear

If you listen to someone or something with half an ear, you listen but do not give them your full attention. She listened to the news with half an ear as she cleaned the bathroom. Gigi listened with half an ear to Yussef and Bassil, who were talking about their school days.
See also: ear, half, listen

listen with half an ear

not give your full attention to someone or something.
See also: ear, half, listen

listen with half an ˈear

not listen with your full attention: I was watching television and listening with half an ear to what he was telling me. OPPOSITE: be all ears
See also: ear, half, listen

listen for

v.
To listen attentively to hear some sound; wait expectantly to hear something or someone: Listen for the doorbell—the pizza should be here soon.
See also: listen

listen in

v.
1. To listen to something or to someone conversing without participating in the conversation: It is rude to listen in on other people's conversations. We put our ears to the door and listened in.
2. To tune in and listen to a broadcast: Listen in next week to the conclusion of our jazz concert series!
See also: listen

listen up

v.
To pay attention closely; be attentive. Used chiefly as a command: Listen up—I'm only going to tell you this once! I want you to listen up and do what I tell you to do.
See also: listen, up

I’m listening

sent. Keep talking.; Make your explanation now. I’m sure there’s an explanation. Well, I’m listening.
See also: listen

listen up

in. to listen carefully. (Usually a command.) Now, listen up! This is important.
See also: listen, up

stop, look, and listen

Railroad crossing warning. Before the installation of gates and flashing lights, a road that crossed a railroad track had a post on which was an X. On the crossbars was written “stop look listen,” a phrase attributed to an anonymous engineer who through that immigrants who read only rudimentary English would be able to understand the three words and heed their warning. Now automatic devices warn motorists and pedestrians to be mindful of approaching trains.
See also: and, listen
References in periodicals archive ?
Vandergrift and Goh (2012) proposed a theoretical model of L2 listening comprehension that incorporates the constructs of bottom-up and top-down processing (Eysenck, 1993) and metacognition (Flavell, 1979; Wenden, 1998).
Theorizing listening as a pathway to ethical being and dialogical practice, Lipari's (2009, 2010) conceptualizations of "listening otherwise" and "listening being" have complicated and deepened our understanding of the principled dimensions of listening.
Speaking and listening now surpass writing and reading as the most common forms of workplace communication.
In her final chapter on ethics, Lacey discusses the ethics of being addressed, and considers positions associated with listening to citizens, against listening as citizens.
In a way, you can blame yourself for not listening.
Another reason that listening is such a popular subject for researchers of interpersonal communication is that listening is understood as having such an intense impact on the interpersonal relationship, the most common unit of analysis in interpersonal communication.
Improving this process is crucial yet individuals are often unaware of their listening habits, let alone of the impact of the way they listen on workplace interactions.
This is one of the first studies where listening to music has been explored at molecular level, and the first study to show association between arginine vasopressin receptor 1A (AVPR1A) gene variants with listening to music.
According to Rabbi Noah Weinberg, Founder and former Dean of Aish HaTorah, the word Shema, which God said to Abraham, implies a deep level of listening.
Hence, an awareness of the importance of listening and its contribution to language proficiency is fundamental to a well grounded L2 pedagogy.
Language practitioners are well aware that listening activity in English for Specific Purposes is an active and demanding process of selecting and interpreting information from auditory and visual clues.
In his January 31, 2007, BusinessWeek article, "Why Leadership Means Listening," Gallo lists some of the tips for becoming a better listener he collected while researching his book.
Listening carefully to a client is critical in order that a tax issue is properly defined and the subsequent application of the tax law is correct.