listen

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talk to the hand

A rude interjection meant to interrupt and dismiss what another person is saying. (Sometimes written or spoken in longer forms, such as, "talk to the hand, because the face isn't listening," or the like.) Dad: "Sarah, would you mind cleaning up the—" Sarah: "Talk to the hand, dad! I've got too much going on to be dealing with chores around the house!" All of us were aghast when Jonathan turned to the police officer and said, "Talk to the hand, 'cause the face ain't interested!"
See also: hand, talk

I'm listening.

 and I'm all ears.
Inf. You have my attention, so you should talk. Bob: Look, old pal. I want to talk to you about something. Tom: I'm listening. Bill: I guess I owe you an apology. Jane: I'm all ears.
See also: listen

listen for someone or something

to try to hear someone or something. I will have to let you in the front door if you come home late. I will listen for you. I am listening for the telephone.
See also: listen

listen in

 (on someone or something)
1. to join someone or a group as a listener. The band is rehearsing. Let's go listen in on them. It won't hurt to listen in, will it?
2. to eavesdrop on someone. Please don't try to listen in on us. This is a private conversation. I am not listening in. I was here first. You are talking too loud.
See also: listen

listen to reason

to yield to a reasonable argument; to take the reasonable course. Please listen to reason, and don't do something you'll regret. She got into trouble because she wouldn't listen to reason.
See also: listen, reason

listen to someone or something

 
1. to pay attention to and hear someone or something. Listen to me! Hear what I have to say! I want to listen to his speech.
2. to heed someone, orders, or advice. Listen to me! Do what I tell you! You really should listen to his advice.
See also: listen

listen up

to listen carefully. (Usually a command.) Now, listen up! This is important. Listen up, you guys!
See also: listen, up

stop, look, and listen

to exercise caution, especially at street corners and railroad crossings, by stopping, looking to the left and to the right, and listening for approaching vehicles or a train. Sally's mother trained her to stop, look, and listen at every street corner. It is a good practice to stop, look, and listen at a railroad crossing.
See also: and, listen

listen in

1. Hear or overhear the conversation of others; eavesdrop. It is also put as listen in on, as in She listened in on her parents and learned they were planning a surprise party. [Early 1900s]
2. Tune in and listen to a broadcast, as in Were you listening in the other night when they played Beethoven's Fifth? [1920s]
See also: listen

listen to reason

Pay heed to sensible advice or argument, as in We can't let him rush into that job-it's time he listened to reason. [Mid-1700s]
See also: listen, reason

listen with half an ear

If you listen to someone or something with half an ear, you listen but do not give them your full attention. She listened to the news with half an ear as she cleaned the bathroom. Gigi listened with half an ear to Yussef and Bassil, who were talking about their school days.
See also: ear, half, listen

listen for

v.
To listen attentively to hear some sound; wait expectantly to hear something or someone: Listen for the doorbell—the pizza should be here soon.
See also: listen

listen in

v.
1. To listen to something or to someone conversing without participating in the conversation: It is rude to listen in on other people's conversations. We put our ears to the door and listened in.
2. To tune in and listen to a broadcast: Listen in next week to the conclusion of our jazz concert series!
See also: listen

listen up

v.
To pay attention closely; be attentive. Used chiefly as a command: Listen up—I'm only going to tell you this once! I want you to listen up and do what I tell you to do.
See also: listen, up

I’m listening

sent. Keep talking.; Make your explanation now. I’m sure there’s an explanation. Well, I’m listening.
See also: listen

listen up

in. to listen carefully. (Usually a command.) Now, listen up! This is important.
See also: listen, up

stop, look, and listen

Railroad crossing warning. Before the installation of gates and flashing lights, a road that crossed a railroad track had a post on which was an X. On the crossbars was written “stop look listen,” a phrase attributed to an anonymous engineer who through that immigrants who read only rudimentary English would be able to understand the three words and heed their warning. Now automatic devices warn motorists and pedestrians to be mindful of approaching trains.
See also: and, listen
References in classic literature ?
Unrestrained by the young man's presence she threw up her mouth, put her lips near the bars, and piped away in easeful grace to the attentive listeners.
The listener at the ventilator came to his feet slowly, like an old man.
There was something so uncommon in her manner, that the flesh of the concealed listener crept as he heard the girl utter these words, and the blood chilled within him.
After receving an assurance from both, that she might safely do so, she proceeded in a voice so low that it was often difficult for the listener to discover even the purport of what she said, to describe, by name and situation, the public-house whence she had been followed that night.
The open sympathy of the listeners stirred the spirit of the votary of music, whose voice regained its richness and volume, without losing that touching softness which proved its secret charm.
In short, so rapidly had the savage sounds diffused themselves over the barren rock, that it was not difficult for the anxious listeners to imagine they could be heard beneath, as in truth they were above on every side of them.
Like all people who try to exhaust a subject, he exhausted his listeners.
He charmed his listeners out of themselves, and they followed his pipe, laughing.
He well understood the character of his listeners, who were mostly a primitive people in their habits; and who, being a good deal addicted to subtleties and nice distinctions in their religious opinions, viewed the introduction of any such temporal assistance as form into their spiritual worship not only with jealousy, but frequently with disgust.
shouted Nicholas, banging the table- very little to the point as it seemed to his listeners, but quite relevantly to the course of his own thoughts.
The little circle of listeners had caught something of his own gravity.
He selected from the vast mass of detail with an artist's touch, drawing pictures of life that glowed and burned with light and color, injecting movement so that his listeners surged along with him on the flood of rough eloquence, enthusiasm, and power.
And you needn't stop to discourse with sympathetic listeners on your way, either.
But nobody thought about her appearance when the power and magic of her voice caught and held her listeners spellbound.
It was not all noise and jest, however, at The Boot, nor were the whole party listeners to the speech.