listen for

listen for someone or something

to try to hear someone or something. I will have to let you in the front door if you come home late. I will listen for you. I am listening for the telephone.
See also: listen

listen for

v.
To listen attentively to hear some sound; wait expectantly to hear something or someone: Listen for the doorbell—the pizza should be here soon.
See also: listen
References in periodicals archive ?
In the initial stages of this technique, students are supposed to listen for general understanding and later they should listen for details as they add to their notes through negotiating with their peers.
Then they will decide on details that require further attention, and listen for additional information.
Because I had already previewed the questions, I knew what I should listen for.
When I listened, I did not need to understand all the words and phrases; I listen for the messages only.
I learned to listen for each voice, to achieve the proper balance among the voices in replication as well as in my own interpretation.
One of the first principles in crisis intervention is to listen for the emotions exhibited by the subject and how they relate to the facts of the situation.
My wife Janet and I take time each morning on waking to pray and listen for direction from the God who has led us so wonderfully all these years in fair weather and foul.
In essence, the call to listen is itself a call to prayer: "We are a people of prayer and discernment; come and listen for God's voice with us.
One way to avoid interrupting unintentionally is to listen for words that indicate the speaker may have more to say, such as "and' "also' "beside, ""in other words.
Effective listeners listen for ideas and concepts, not just facts.
I listen for that everyday when I'm getting ready to go home.
Quote: ``One thing I listen for are the headlines to see if there are any major disasters or other occurrences that might affect my daily life,'' said North Hollywood resident Eric Krackow, 55, a marketing research and sales specialist.
Alert children to the organizational structure of your message and tell them what to listen for ("Today you will be working in groups on the class newspaper.
If a patient wants you to listen for 20 minutes and you only have 10, you can prepare them for the interaction so they don't feel rushed.
The basic musical elements the coach must listen for include correct pitches, rhythms and words.