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link whore

Internet slang (possibly offensive) A person who makes constant and conspicuous efforts to drive Internet traffic to their own webpage by posting links to it across other areas of the Internet. There are so many link whores filling this forum with garbage posts that it's become nearly unreadable.
See also: link, whore

link whoring

Internet slang (possibly offensive) The practice of making constant and conspicuous efforts to drive Internet traffic to one's own webpage by posting links to it across other areas of the Internet. The link whoring that goes on in this forum has made it nearly unreadable in recent times.
See also: link, whore

a chain is only as strong as its weakest link

If one part of something is weak, it jeopardizes the integrity, quality, or effectiveness of the whole. I need to make sure that everyone on our debate team is well-prepared, since a chain is only as strong as its weakest link.
See also: chain, link, strong, weak

missing link

1. A hypothetical extinct animal that is believed to be the evolutionary connection between man and ape. Scientists will never fully understand the evolution of man until they find the missing link.
2. Something that is significantly, noticeably absent, often because its presence would be helpful or beneficial. Participation is the missing link in your grade, so I would suggest speaking up in class going forward. I think that chlorine is the missing link in this experiment.
See also: link, missing

weak link

Someone or something considered inferior to the other parts of a group, series, or mechanism. The weak link in computer security is almost always the end user. Derek hardly ever comes to class, so I'm not surprised he was the weak link in our group project.
See also: link, weak

a chain is no stronger than its weakest link

If one part of something is weak, it jeopardizes the integrity, quality, or effectiveness of the whole. I need to make sure that everyone on our debate team is well-prepared, since a chain is no stronger than its weakest link. A chain is no stronger than its weakest link, and our security will not be effective if any of the checkpoints are not functioning.
See also: chain, link, strong, weak

chain is no stronger than its weakest link

Prov. A successful group or team relies on each member doing well. George is completely out of shape. I don't want him on our ball team; a chain is only as strong as its weakest link.
See also: chain, link, strong, weak

*contact with someone a link to someone

resulting in communication. (*Typically: be in ~; have ~; make~.) I have had no contact with Bill since he left town. Tom made contact with a known criminal last month.
See also: contact, link

link someone or something to someone or something

 and link someone or something and someone or something together; link someone or something together with someone or something ; link someone or something with someone or something
1. to discover a connection between people and things, in any combination. I would never have thought of linking Fred to Tom. I didn't even know they knew each other. I always sort of linked Tom with honesty.
2. to connect people and things, in any combination. We have to link each person to one other person, using this colored yarn to tie them together. We linked each decoration together with another one.
See also: link

link someone or something up (to something)

to connect someone or something to something, usually with something that has a type of fastener or connector that constitutes a link. They promised that they would link me up to the network today. They will link up my computer to the network today.
See also: link, up

link up to someone or something

 and link (up) with someone or something
to join up with someone or something. I have his new e-mail address so I can link up to Bruce. Now my computer can link up with a computer bulletin board.
See also: link, up

weak link (in the chain)

Fig. the weak point or person in a system or organization. Joan's hasty generalizations about the economy were definitely the weak link in her argument.
See also: link, weak

weak link

The least dependable member of a group, as in The shipping department, slow in getting out orders, is our weak link in customer service , or They're all very capable designers except for Ron, who is clearly the weak link. This expression alludes to the fragile portion of a chain, where it is most likely to break. [Mid-1800s]
See also: link, weak

a weak link

or

a weak link in the chain

COMMON If you describe someone or something as a weak link or a weak link in the chain, you mean that they are an unreliable part of a system or member of a group, and because of them the whole system or group may fail. It was automatically assumed that Edward would be the weak link in the partnership. Success comes from teamwork, and all it takes is one weak link in the chain to deny you the rewards of any amount of hard work. Note: People also say that someone or something is the weakest link if they are the most unreliable part of a system. He was the weakest link in the team's defence. Note: People sometimes say that a system is only as strong as its weakest link. A rail system is only as strong as its weakest link, as any commuter trapped behind a broken-down train can testify.
See also: link, weak

the weak link

the point at which a system, sequence, or organization is most vulnerable; the least dependable element or member.
See also: link, weak

a link in the ˈchain

one of the stages in a process or a line of argument: Many people believe that coming from a broken home may be one of the first links in the chain that eventually leads to a life of crime.
See also: chain, link

the weak ˈlink (in the ˈchain)

the point at which a system or an organization is most likely to fail: She went straight for the one weak link in the chain of his argument.
See also: link, weak

link up

v.
1. To collaborate or team up: The two minority parties linked up to oppose the ruling party. Two popular bands have linked up for a nationwide tour.
2. To introduce someone into a relationship or collaboration with others: Can you link me up with a good financial adviser? I linked them up last year and now they are partners. The convention links up buyers and sellers.
3. To join together: The two trains linked up to form one long train. This road links up with the highway in six miles.
4. To connect something with some other thing: We linked the trailer up to the truck. I linked up four extension cords and plugged the vacuum cleaner in. They linked the computers up so that they could share files.
5. To meet with someone, especially in order to do something: Let's link up next week and discuss the report. I linked up with my friends after the concert.
See also: link, up
References in periodicals archive ?
When you use the first two methods, Excel automatically creates absolute cell references--as shown by the dollar signs in the linked cell notation ($D$9).
For example, the following formula divides by 2 the sum of the linked amount plus the value in B 15 on the dependent workbook:
As a further disincentive, this process must be repeated to find each linked cell.
Since then the University of Missouri has linked its Community Connection Web site (http://www.
As a result statements made in the paper discussing the "reliability superiority" of soft-linked items to hard linked items are completely unfounded.
Items that are linked together result in error terms that are correlated thus violating the assumption.
The authors suggest in their article that linked items would be beneficial in "computerized testing".
Pope and Harley made the claim that linked items, in general, violate independence.
After all, it is the computer scoring algorithm that makes linked items soft-linked; hence the name.
application and position the cursor where you wish the linked data to appear.
You can limit the range of the cells to be linked (by listing the range coordinates or range name) and choose whether to bring in the data as common text or as a table.