lime


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in the limelight

At the center of attention. The phrase refers to a type of lamp that was previously used in theatrical stage lighting. My sister loves being in the limelight, but I get really nervous on stage. Once news of this scandal breaks, our company will be in the limelight for months. He handles the financial side of the business, but he prefers not to be in the limelight when it comes to promotions and marketing.
See also: limelight

limejuicer

1. obsolete A British sailor, so called because of the Royal Navy's practice of adding lime juice to grog in order to combat scurvy. Slightly derogatory. Primarily heard in US. A shipful of limejuicers just arrived into port where they met an icy reception from the locals.
2. dated By extension, any British person, especially a man. Slightly derogatory. Primarily heard in US. We don't need some hoity-toity limejuicer coming in telling us how to run our business. Why don't you go back to Brittania, you old limejuicer?

in the limelight

Also, in the spotlight. At the center of public attention or notoriety. For example, John loves being in the limelight, or The reporters made sure the attractive new actress would be in the spotlight. Both terms come from the theater and allude to focusing light on an important person, the first from a lighting device used from about 1840 on, the second from the early 1900s. Also see in the public eye; steal the show.
See also: limelight

limejuicer

and limey
n. a British sailor; and British citizen, typically a male. (The first one is old. Both are a little derogatory.) Some limey answered the telephone and I could hardly understand what she was saying.

in the limelight

In the center of public attention. The term comes from a vivid lighting device used in theaters from about 1840 on to throw a strong light on the star of a performance. Relying on the combustion of oxygen and hydrogen on a surface of lime and a lens for directing the light, it was invented in 1826 by Thomas Drummond. George Bernard Shaw, in a letter concerning a controversy about censorship (ca. 1900), wrote, “Look after the limelight, and the play will look after itself.”
See also: limelight