like a ton of bricks

*like a ton of bricks

Inf. like a great weight or burden. (*Typically: fall ~; hit ~; hit someone ~.) Suddenly, the truth hit me like a ton of bricks. The sudden tax increase hit like a ton of bricks. Everyone became angry.
See also: brick, like, of, ton

like a ton of bricks

Very heavily, without subtlety. For example, If he doesn't like your work, he'll come down on you like a ton of bricks. This expression, often coupled with come down on (def. 1), replaced the earlier thousand of brick or hundred of brick. The allusion in all these is to the considerable weight of such a load. [Early 1900s]
See also: brick, like, of, ton

like a ton of bricks

Like a ton of bricks is used to show that something happens very suddenly and forcefully. By mid-July, the dangers had hit Bobby like a ton of bricks. She was twenty when Orpen met her and he fell for her like a ton of bricks. Note: The metric measurement tonne is occasionally used instead of ton. Then reality hit her like a tonne of bricks.
See also: brick, like, of, ton

like a ton of bricks

mod. like something very ponderous and heavy. Hitting the back end of that truck was like hitting a ton of bricks.
See also: brick, like, of, ton
References in periodicals archive ?
Because we will come down on them like a ton of bricks.
And last week Lib Dem John Hemming tabled an EDM to come down like a ton of bricks on the BBC for saying "come down like a tonne of bricks".
Anyway, Messers Hemming and Nattrass, who unusually find themselves in agreement, can rest assured that the Birmingham Mail will always come down on them like a ton of bricks if they put a foot wrong.
Her art can hit you like a ton of bricks, dissecting the most uncomfortable aspects of gender, society, religion, and politics.