lightly


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Related to lightly: take lightly

get off lightly

1. To have or face less difficulty than would normally be the case. Whereas some graduate students tell horror stories of the hours upon hours of work they have to do for their programs, I feel like I got off quite lightly with mine! Last summer, we seemed to have endless rain, but we got off lightly this year.
2. To face less severe punishment than might be expected, or to escape punishment entirely. I hope you realize you got off lightly. If your uncle—the senator—hadn't intervened, you'd be in jail right now. In the end, we only had to pay a small fine for the damage, so I'd say we got off pretty lightly!
See also: get, lightly, off

not take (something) lightly

To regard something with a great amount of seriousness or gravity. I hope you aren't taking these allegations lightly—they could mean a life in prison! I can promise you that I won't take this job interview lightly.
See also: lightly, not, take

take (something) lightly

To regard something without much seriousness; to be very casual or carefree about something. I hope you aren't taking these allegations lightly—they could mean a life in prison! I've learned to take my work more lightly in recent years. There are just more important things to worry about.
See also: lightly, take

easy come, easy go

Cliché said to explain the loss of something that required only a small amount of effort to acquire in the first place. Ann found twenty dollars in the morning and spent it foolishly at noon. "Easy come, easy go," she said. John spends his money as fast as he can earn it. With John it's easy come, easy go.
See also: easy

get off

 
1. to start off (on a friendship). Tom and Bill had never met before. They seemed to get off all right, though. I'm glad they got off so well.
2. to leave; to depart. What time did they get off? We have to get off early in the morning before the traffic gets heavy.
3. Go to get off (easy); get off (of) someone or something; get off (of) something; get off something; get off to something; get off with something.
See also: get, off

get off (easy)

 and get off (lightly)
to receive very little punishment (for doing something wrong). It was a serious crime, but Mary got off easy. Billy's punishment was very light. Considering what he did, he got off lightly.
See also: get, off

get off (with something)

to receive only a light punishment for something. Let's hope John gets off with a light sentence. Max got off with only a few years in prison.
See also: get, off

get off

(of) someone or something and get off to get down from someone or something. (Of is usually retained before pronouns.) Please get off of me. I can't play piggyback anymore. Get off of the sofa!
See also: get, off

get off

(of) something and get off Inf. to stop discussing the topic that one is supposed to be discussing [and start discussing something else]; to stray from the topic at hand. (Of is usually retained before pronouns.) I wish you wouldn't get off the subject so much. This writer gets off of his topic all the time.
See also: get, off

get off

(something) to climb down from something. Please get off the stairs. You know you shouldn't play on the stairs. I wish that the children would get off that ladder before they fall off.
See also: get, off

get off

(to something) to leave for something. I've got to get off to my violin lesson. We have to get off to the hospital immediately!
See also: get, off

get off (with something)

to receive only a light punishment for something. Let's hope John gets off with a light sentence. Max got off with only a few years in prison.
See also: get, off

get someone off

 
1. to get someone cleared of a criminal charge. Ted's lawyer got him off, although we all knew he was guilty. I hope someone can get her off. She is innocent no matter how it looks.
2. to get someone freed from a responsibility. (See also get off the hook.) I think I can get you off. What do I need to do to get myself off?
See also: get, off

get someone or something off someone or something

 and get someone or something off
to remove someone or something from someone, oneself, or something. Come in and get those wet clothes off. Get him off of me!
See also: get, off

get something off (to someone or something)

 and get something off
to send something to someone or something. I have to get a letter off to Aunt Mary. Did you get off all your packages?
See also: get, off

once-over-lightly

 
1. Fig. a quick and careless treatment. (A noun. Said of an act of cleaning, studying, examination, or appraisal.) Bill gave his geometry the once-over-lightly and then quit studying. Ann, you didn't wash the dishes properly. They only got a once-over-lightly.
2. Fig. cursory; in a quick and careless manner. (An adverb.) Tom studied geometry once-over-lightly. Ann washed the dishes once-over-lightly.

get somebody off

to help someone avoid punishment Milligan was charged with fraud, but his lawyer got him off.
See also: get, off

get off (scot-free)

to avoid punishment or an unpleasant responsibility She got off with just a small fine. If you don't go to the police about it, he'll get off scot-free! She was left to care for her parents while her brother got off scot-free.
Related vocabulary: beat the rap
See also: get, off

easy come, easy go

  (informal)
something that you say in order to describe someone who thinks that everything is easy to achieve, especially earning money, and who therefore does not worry about anything Les could certainly spend money. Easy come, easy go it was with him.
See also: easy

easy come, easy go

Readily won and readily lost, as in Easy come, easy go-that's how it is for Mark when he plays the stock market. This phrase states a truth known since ancient times and expressed in numerous proverbs with slightly different wording ( lightly come, lightly go; quickly come, quickly go). The adverb easy was substituted in the early 1800s.
See also: easy

get off

1. Dismount, leave a vehicle, as in She got off the horse right away, or Let's get off the train at the next stop. [Late 1600s]
2. Start, as on a trip; leave. For example, We got off at the crack of dawn. [Mid-1700s]
3. Fire a round of ammunition; also, send away. For example, He got off two shots, but the deer fled, or I got off that letter just in time.
4. Escape from punishment; also, obtain a lesser penalty or release for someone. For example, He apologized so profusely that he was sure to get off, or The attorney got her client off with a slap on the wrist. This sense is sometimes amplified to get off easy or get off lightly. Where there is no punishment at all, the expression is sometimes put as get off scot-free, originally meaning "be free from paying a fine or tax ( scot)," dating from the 1500s. [Mid-1600s]
5. Remove, take off, as in I can't seem to get this paint off the car. [Second half of 1600s]
6. Succeed in uttering, especially a joke. For example, Carl always manages to get off a good one before he gets serious. [Mid-1800s]
7. Have the effrontery to do or say something. For example, Where does he get off telling me what to do? [Colloquial; early 1900s]
8. Experience orgasm, as in She never did get off. [Slang; first half of 1900s]
9. Also, get off of one. Stop bothering or criticizing one, as in Get off me right now! or If you don't get off of me I'm walking out. [Slang; c. 1940] Also see get off on; off one's back.
See also: get, off

once over lightly

Cursorily, quickly, as in I did go over the program once over lightly, but perhaps I should read it more carefully. [Colloquial; mid-1900s]
See also: lightly, once

get off

v.
1. To remove oneself from something that supports, carries, or holds: I got off my chair and ran down the hall. After we got off the plane, we picked up our baggage. Get off the couch!
2. To remove something from a supporting, carrying, or holding thing: Get the cat off the table!
3. To start, as on a trip; leave. It took so long to pack that we didn't get off until noon.
4. To send something; transmit something: I'll get a letter off to you next week.
5. To cause something to be emitted, as when firing a weapon: The hunter got off two shots before the deer disappeared. The archer got three arrows off before hitting the bull's-eye.
6. To escape, as from punishment or danger: They thought the judge would sentence them harshly, but somehow they got off.
7. To obtain a release or lesser penalty for someone: The attorney got her client off with just a small fine.
8. To get permission to leave one's workplace: The sales crew got off early and went out for a walk.
9. Slang To stop pressuring, pestering, or domineering someone: The boss thought the employees were lazy and didn't get off them the whole day. Get off me!—I can't work with you watching over me.
10. Slang To feel great pleasure or gratification from something: They really got off on that roller coaster ride at the amusement park. I don't really get off on photography.
11. Slang To cause someone to feel great pleasure or gratification; satisfy someone: That movie really didn't get me off.
12. Vulgar Slang To achieve orgasm.
13. Vulgar Slang To cause someone to achieve orgasm.
See also: get, off

get off

verb
See also: get, off

once over lightly

1. mod. quickly and superficially; carelessly; cursorily. (This is hyphenated before a nominal.) He looked at it once over lightly and agreed to do it.
2. n. a perfunctory examination; a quick glance. Once over lightly is not enough.
See also: lightly, once
References in periodicals archive ?
Once the biscuit dough has chilled, roll out on a lightly floured surface or between two sheets of non-stick parchment paper to around 2mm thick.
INGREDIENTS Biscuits: 100g slightly salted butter, softened 100g icing sugar 1 egg, lightly beaten 1 tsp almond extract 100g ground almonds 200g plain flour Extras 100g white marzipan Runny honey-used as glue
MAKES 12 SCONES 250g plain flour 50g caster sugar 3 tsp baking powder 1 tsp ground ginger A pinch of salt 100g cold butter, diced 125ml soured cream 2 eggs, lightly beaten 100g blackberries (Mark used them from frozen) 1 beaten egg for brushing 1 Preheat the oven to 200C/180C fan/Gas Mark 6 and line a baking tray with greased baking paper.
Smith, Tread Lightly strives to protect the client's interests by providing the guides, checklists and background information that every consumer and client advocate must know to both successfully purchase and maintain a complex life insurance portfolio.
Turn onto a lightly floured surface and knead gently.
INGREDIENTS: FOR THE CUPCAKES (makes 24) 100g slightly salted butter, softened 100g caster sugar 2 large eggs, lightly beaten 1/2 tsp vanilla extract 100g self-raising flour 10 mini eggs FOR THE BISCUIT CHIPS: 100g slightly salted butter, softened 100g caster sugar 1 large egg, lightly beaten 1/2tsp vanilla extract 200g self raising flour FOR THE CREME PATISSIERE-EGG MAYONNAISE: See recipe above right EXTRAS: 48 Mini Eggs METHOD: PRE-HEAT the oven to 170degC, 150degC Fan, Gas Mark 3.
Synopsis: Tiptoes Lightly loves the sea, and when Farmer John and his children, Tom Nutcracker and June Berry, drive to the seaside for Thanksgiving she goes along with them.
Tip the dough onto a lightly floured work surface and knead for five to 10 minutes until the dough starts to form a soft, smooth skin.
About 33 people were killed, 33 missing, and 92 others injured seriously and 352 lightly because of the quake.
Summary: The President of Mauritania has reportedly been lightly injured in a "friendly fire" incident in the country.
based Perdue, the line of grilled, lightly breaded and roasted chicken products deliver the nutrition and great taste that naturally comes from real, simple and recognizable ingredients, such as sea salt, unbleached wheat flour, cracked black pepper and olive oil.
Use lightly on the brows, or for stronger tone, on the lid.
Method: Wash the spinach and lightly cook it with a knob of butter for a few minutes.
Bake in a preheated 350-degree oven 15 to 20 minutes, until lightly golden.
From the start, Minowa knew that he would build his company with the core value of living lightly on the Earth.