lift

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lift

1. n. the potency of alcohol in liquor. Now, this imported stuff has enough lift to raise the dead.
2. n. a brief spiritual or ego-lifting occurrence. Your kind words have given me quite a lift.
3. and lift-up n. drug euphoria; a rush. (Drugs.) The lift-up from the shot jarred her bones.
4. tv. to steal something. She had lifted this ring. We found it on her when we arrested her.
5. tv. to take something away. It was his third offense, so they lifted his license.
6. n. a tall heel on shoes that makes someone seem taller. (Usually plural.) I feel better in my lifts.
7. n. a surgical face-lift. He had a lift on his vacation, but his face still looked two sizes too big.
8. n. a device—worn under the hair at the temples—that provides some of the effects of a surgical face-lift. Do you think she’s wearing a lift?
9. n. a ride; transportation. Would you like a lift over to your apartment?
See:
References in classic literature ?
Under-powered craft, we are told, can ascend to the limit of their lift, mail-packets to look out for them accordingly; the lower lanes westward are pitting very badly, "with frequent blow-outs, vortices, laterals, etc.
Our turbines scream shrilly; the propellers cannot bite on the thin air; Tim shunts the lift out of five tanks at once and by sheer weight drives her bullet wise through the maelstrom till she cushions with jar on an up-gust, three thousand feet below.
An under-tanked Moghrabi boat had risen to the limit of her lift, and, finding no improvement, had dropped a couple of thousand.
But some skippers -will navigate without enough lift.
They didn't lift that last sack," Kearns protested.
Flambeau, quite bewildered with this fanaticism, could not refrain from asking Miss Pauline (with direct French logic) why a pair of spectacles was a more morbid sign of weakness than a lift, and why, if science might help us in the one effort, it might not help us in the other.
Father Brown found Flambeau and some six other people standing round the enclosed space into which the lift commonly descended.
In an instant like a bolt from the blue, like a thunderbolt from nowhere, that beautiful and defiant body had been dashed down the open well of the lift to death at the bottom.
I think, to tell the truth, she thought herself somewhat deeper in the mysteries than she was; and she has often said to me, as we went down in the lift together, that if one's will were strong enough, one could float down as harmlessly as a feather.
Pocket got his hands in his hair again, and this time really did lift himself some inches out of his chair.
Then, he melted into parental tenderness, and gave them a shilling apiece and told them to go and play; and then as they went out, with one very strong effort to lift himself up by the hair he dismissed the hopeless subject.
and so down I plumped on the lift side of her leddyship, to be aven with the willain.
And that's jist the thruth of the rason why he wears his lift hand in a sling.
I looked for the boat, and, while Wolf Larsen cleared the boat- tackles, saw it lift to leeward on a big sea an not a score of feet away.
Then, the next moment, we would lift and soar upward while they sank far down beneath us.