lie at anchor

lie at anchor

[for a ship] to wait or rest at anchor. The ship lay at anchor throughout the day while a shore party searched for the runaway. We lay at anchor overnight, waiting for the tide.
See also: anchor, lie
References in classic literature ?
He held them silent with ghastly stories of the "Yo-hoes" on Monomoy Beach, that mock and terrify lonely clam-diggers; of sand-walkers and dune-haunters who were never properly buried; of hidden treasure on Fire Island guarded by the spirits of Kidd's men; of ships that sailed in the fog straight over Truro township; of that harbour in Maine where no one but a stranger will lie at anchor twice in a certain place because of a dead crew who row alongside at midnight with the anchor in the bow of their old-fashioned boat, whistling - not calling, but whistling - for the soul of the man who broke their rest.
By: Egypt Today staff CAIRO -- 11 November 2017: The cruise ship Mein Schiff 5, carrying 3,460 tourists from different nationalities, arrived in Safaga, a Red Sea town, on Friday to lie at anchor for two days before it sails to other international ports.
From the Italian quaranta (forty), "quarantine" refers to the practice established in European port cities during the Black Death requiring vessels to lie at anchor for 40 days before landing.
Trawlers lie at anchor in the bay, mesh nets coiled on drums.
Luxury Lamborghinis, Range Rovers and Maseratis line the streets and multimillion pound yachts lie at anchor.
We must sail sometimes with the wind and sometimes against it--but sail we must and not drift, nor lie at anchor.
At the moment, the Albert J Myer and the rest of the Ghost Fleet still lie at anchor, the floating dead.
Out-of-work spy ships, still emblazoned with the hammer and sickle, lie at anchor in the narrow channel that leads to the grimlooking passenger terminal.