let loose of

let loose of someone or something

 
1. to loosen the grasp on someone or something. Please let loose of me! Will you let loose of the doorknob?
2. to become independent from someone or something. She is nearly forty years old and has not yet let loose of her mother. Dave can't let loose of his childhood.
See also: let, loose, of
References in classic literature ?
Then the creature lowered away until Bradley's head came in sudden and painful contact with the floor below, after which the Wieroo let loose of the rope entirely and the Englishman's body crashed to the wooden planking.
Many parents feel the dawning of the teenage years and the beginning of junior high is a time that parents should let go and that their teens should be taking care of themselves, and tend to let loose of the reins,'' Chester said.
Two hundred feet above the ground, electricians for Olsson Industrial, Jeff Jacobson (above left) and Dana Gillespie, let loose of a broken 50-pound light assembly as it is carried away by a Weyerhaeuser helicopter.
CHRIS PIETSCH / The Register-Guard Two hundred feet above the ground, electricians for Olsson Industrial, Jeff Jacobson (above left) and Dana Gillespie, let loose of a broken 50-pound light assembly as it is carried away by a Weyerhaeuser helicopter.
Dealing with teens at the high school level, parents feel teens should be taking care of themselves and tend to let loose of the reins,'' Chester said.
Beginning the period on top, Berman let loose of Palmer to fall behind 4-3 in the 152-pound bout.