lend

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Related to lends: lender, lens, lense, lands, lends itself, blends

distance lends enchantment (to the view)

When one is removed from something, it becomes deceptively appealing. But you hated that rickety old house when we lived there! Remember that distance lends enchantment to the view.

lend an ear (to)

To listen to someone, especially when they are discussing a problem. Sorry I'm late, I had to lend an ear to Jane. She's been going through a lot lately. Thank you for lending an ear, I feel much better now that I've gotten that off my chest. Please lend an ear to Ian, who will be giving us an update about the last quarter.
See also: ear, lend

lend itself to (something)

To be suited for (something), especially some kind of purpose or use. This fabric really lends itself to evening wear. The chefs are always looking for versatile ingredients that lend themselves to many dishes.
See also: itself, lend

Distance lends enchantment (to the view).

Prov. Things that are far away from you appear better than they really are. Jill: High school was the happiest time of my life. Jane: But that was fifteen years ago. I think distance lends enchantment to the view.

lend a hand

(to someone) Go to lend (someone) a hand.
See also: hand, lend

lend an ear to someone or something

 and lend your ear to someone or something
Fig. to listen to someone or what someone has to say. Lend an ear to me and I will tell you a story. Lend your ear to what I am saying.
See also: ear, lend

lend color to something

Fig. to provide an interesting accompaniment for something. Your clever comments lent a great deal of color to the slide show of your vacation. The excellent master of ceremonies will lend color to an otherwise dry panel discussion.
See also: color, lend

lend oneself or itself to something

Fig. [for someone or something] to be adaptable to something; [for someone or something] to be useful for something. This room doesn't lend itself to bright colors. John doesn't lend himself to casual conversation. I don't think that this gown lends itself to outdoor occasions.
See also: itself, lend

lend (someone) a hand

 and lend a hand (to someone)
Fig. to give someone some help, not necessarily with the hands. Could you lend me a hand with this piano? I need to move it across the room. Could you lend a hand with this math assignment? I'd be happy to lend a hand.
See also: hand, lend

lend someone a hand with something

Fig. to help someone with something. (This need not involve "hands.") Could you please lend us a hand with this? Can I lend you a hand with that?
See also: hand, lend

lend something out (to someone)

to allow someone to borrow something. I lent my tuxedo out to a friend who was going to a dance, and now I haven't anything to wear to the opera. I lent out my copy of the book. Sorry, I lent it out.
See also: lend, out

lend something to someone

to make a loan of something to someone. Never lend money to a friend. Would you be able to lend your coat to Fred?
See also: lend

Lend your money and lose your friend.

Prov. You should not lend money to your friends; if you do, either you will have to bother your friend to repay the loan, which will make your friend resent you, or your friend will not repay the loan, which will make you resent your friend. Bill: Joe needs a hundred dollars to pay his landlord. I'm thinking about lending it to him. Alan: Lend your money and lose your friend.
See also: and, friend, lend, lose, money

give a hand

1. Also, lend a hand. Help a person, as in Let me give you a hand with those chairs, or Jane is always willing to lend a hand with refreshments. [Mid-1800s]
2. Also, give a big hand. Give an enthusiastic round of applause, as in Please give her a hand. One can also be given applause or get a big hand, as in This speaker always gets a big hand. [Early 1800s]
See also: give, hand

lend a hand

Also, lend a helping hand. Be of assistance, as in Can you lend them a hand with putting up the flag, or Peter is always willing to lend a helping hand around the house. [Late 1500s]
See also: hand, lend

lend color to

Embellish, especially to give the appearance of truth. For example, I'm sure he lied about reaching the summit; that detailed account about losing his pack merely lent color to the story . This expression uses color in the sense of "appearance of authenticity." [Late 1700s]
See also: color, lend

lend itself to

Adapt to, be suitable for. For example, The Bible lends itself to numerous interpretations, or This plot of land lends itself to a variety of uses. [Mid-1800s]
See also: itself, lend

lend one's ear

Also, lend an ear. Pay attention, listen, as in "Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears" (Shakespeare, Julius Caesar, 3:2). This idiom may be obsolescent. [Late 1300s]
See also: ear, lend

lend an ear

or

lend a sympathetic ear

If you lend an ear or lend a sympathetic ear to someone or their problems, you listen to them carefully and with concern. My mother was always willing to lend an ear and offer what advice she could. My colleagues lent a sympathetic ear to my complaints but could do nothing to help.
See also: ear, lend

lend (someone) a hand

COMMON If you lend a hand or lend someone a hand, you help someone to do something. If I'd known, I'd have been glad to lend a hand — you should have called me up. I do the cooking and Bryan lends a hand with the washing-up. Could you lend me a hand with these books, please? Note: A hand is used in many other structures with a similar meaning. I used to give Mary a hand with the catering. Need a hand with those? I could see you'd want a hand with the children.
See also: hand, lend

lend (or give) colour to

make something seem true or probable.
1991 J. Rusbridger The Intelligence Game Nothing should be done that would lend colour to any suggestion that it [the Security Service] is concerned with the interests of any particular section of the community.
See also: colour, lend

give (or lend) a hand

assist in an action or enterprise.
See also: give, hand

lend an ear (or your ears)

listen to someone sympathetically or attentively.
See also: ear, lend

lend your name to something

allow yourself to be publicly associated with something.
See also: lend, name, something

lend ˈcolour to something

(British English) (American English lend ˈcolor to something) make something seem probable: The tracks outside the house lend colour to her claim that somebody tried to break in last night.
See also: colour, lend, something

lend an ˈear (to somebody/something)

listen to what somebody is telling you: He’s a good friend. He’s always ready to lend a sympathetic ear.
See also: ear, lend

lend (somebody) a ˈhand (with something)

help somebody (to do something): I saw two men pushing a broken-down car along the road so I stopped to lend them a hand.She stayed with us for three weeks and didn’t once lend a hand with the housework!
See also: hand, lend

lend your ˈname to something

(formal) let it be known in public that you support or agree with something: Famous actors sometimes lend their names to political causes.
See also: lend, name, something

lend supˈport, ˈweight, ˈcredence, etc. to something

make something seem more likely to be true or genuine: This latest evidence lends support to her theory.
See also: lend, something

lend a hand

To be of assistance.
See also: hand, lend

lend (itself) to

To accommodate or offer itself to; be suitable for: "The presidency does not lend itself to on the job training" (Joe Biden).
See also: lend
References in classic literature ?
Lend me your back -- but don't let the cardinal go.
Said Paul' I'll lend you, when I can, All the spare money I have got-- Ah, Peter, you're a happy man
You little guessed How deep it drained my slender store: But there's a heart within this breast, And I WILL LEND YOU FIFTY MORE
The one, that the tooth of usury be grinded, that it bite not too much; the other, that there be left open a means, to invite moneyed men to lend to the merchants, for the continuing and quickening of trade.
Secondly, let there be certain persons licensed, to lend to known merchants, upon usury at a higher rate; and let it be with the cautions following.
As this is one of those deep observations which very few readers can be supposed capable of making themselves, I have thought proper to lend them my assistance; but this is a favour rarely to be expected in the course of my work.
I have come, sir," he said, "to ask you to lend me some money.
Luker informed me, sir, that he had no money to lend.
But I never lend it to strangers, and I never lend it on such a security as you have produced.
Supposing, sir, it had been possible (and customary) for you to lend me the money," he said, "in what space of time would it have been possible
State Street lends securities in more than 35 markets around the world via a global network of trading locations -- providing customers with around-the-clock opportunities, as well as regional expertise and experience.
Its ease of use makes Daneizo ideal for school libraries, audio-visual or electronics lending, film schools, wallcovering or carpet stores, or anyone else who lends items or samples for later return by customers, employees, or other users.
State Street lends securities in more than 35 markets around the world via trading desks throughout North America, Europe, and the Asia/Pacific region -- providing clients with around-the-clock opportunities as well as regional expertise and experience.
The Company lends securities in 31 markets on behalf of investors across the world via its offices in Boston, Hong Kong, London, Montreal, Sydney, Tokyo, and Toronto.
The Company lends securities in 27 markets on behalf of investors across the world.