lend


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Related to lend: lend a hand

Distance lends enchantment (to the view).

Prov. Things that are far away from you appear better than they really are. Jill: High school was the happiest time of my life. Jane: But that was fifteen years ago. I think distance lends enchantment to the view.
See also: distance, lend

lend a hand

(to someone) Go to lend (someone) a hand.
See also: hand, lend

lend an ear to someone or something

 and lend your ear to someone or something
Fig. to listen to someone or what someone has to say. Lend an ear to me and I will tell you a story. Lend your ear to what I am saying.
See also: ear, lend

lend color to something

Fig. to provide an interesting accompaniment for something. Your clever comments lent a great deal of color to the slide show of your vacation. The excellent master of ceremonies will lend color to an otherwise dry panel discussion.
See also: color, lend

lend oneself or itself to something

Fig. [for someone or something] to be adaptable to something; [for someone or something] to be useful for something. This room doesn't lend itself to bright colors. John doesn't lend himself to casual conversation. I don't think that this gown lends itself to outdoor occasions.
See also: itself, lend

lend (someone) a hand

 and lend a hand (to someone)
Fig. to give someone some help, not necessarily with the hands. Could you lend me a hand with this piano? I need to move it across the room. Could you lend a hand with this math assignment? I'd be happy to lend a hand.
See also: hand, lend

lend someone a hand with something

Fig. to help someone with something. (This need not involve "hands.") Could you please lend us a hand with this? Can I lend you a hand with that?
See also: hand, lend

lend something out (to someone)

to allow someone to borrow something. I lent my tuxedo out to a friend who was going to a dance, and now I haven't anything to wear to the opera. I lent out my copy of the book. Sorry, I lent it out.
See also: lend, out

lend something to someone

to make a loan of something to someone. Never lend money to a friend. Would you be able to lend your coat to Fred?
See also: lend

Lend your money and lose your friend.

Prov. You should not lend money to your friends; if you do, either you will have to bother your friend to repay the loan, which will make your friend resent you, or your friend will not repay the loan, which will make you resent your friend. Bill: Joe needs a hundred dollars to pay his landlord. I'm thinking about lending it to him. Alan: Lend your money and lose your friend.
See also: and, friend, lend, lose, money

lend an ear to somebody/something

to listen carefully and with understanding to someone or something Bush lent an ear to a group of oil executives who came to the White House. Aunt Rosalie lent a sympathetic ear to my troubles.
See also: ear, lend

give somebody a hand

also give a hand to somebody
to help someone If you have any trouble with your homework, I'll be glad to give you a hand. She tries to give a hand to those in need of help.
See also: give, hand

lend a (helping) hand

also lend somebody a hand
to help do something Jay expected his children to lend a hand where they were needed.
See also: hand, lend

lend itself to something

to be good for a particular use It was surprising how well her book lent itself to being turned into a film.
See also: itself, lend

give somebody a hand

to help someone do something, especially something that involves physical effort (often + with ) Could you give me a hand with these boxes, Mike? Let me know when you're moving and I'll give you a hand.
See also: give, hand

lend an ear

to listen carefully and in a friendly way to someone, especially someone who is telling you about a problem If you have any problems, go to Claire. She'll always lend a sympathetic ear.
See also: ear, lend

lend (somebody) a hand

to help someone do something, especially something that involves physical effort Could you lend me a hand with these books? He's always willing to lend a hand in the kitchen.
See also: hand, lend

give a hand

1. Also, lend a hand. Help a person, as in Let me give you a hand with those chairs, or Jane is always willing to lend a hand with refreshments. [Mid-1800s]
2. Also, give a big hand. Give an enthusiastic round of applause, as in Please give her a hand. One can also be given applause or get a big hand, as in This speaker always gets a big hand. [Early 1800s]
See also: give, hand

lend a hand

Also, lend a helping hand. Be of assistance, as in Can you lend them a hand with putting up the flag, or Peter is always willing to lend a helping hand around the house. [Late 1500s]
See also: hand, lend

lend color to

Embellish, especially to give the appearance of truth. For example, I'm sure he lied about reaching the summit; that detailed account about losing his pack merely lent color to the story . This expression uses color in the sense of "appearance of authenticity." [Late 1700s]
See also: color, lend

lend itself to

Adapt to, be suitable for. For example, The Bible lends itself to numerous interpretations, or This plot of land lends itself to a variety of uses. [Mid-1800s]
See also: itself, lend

lend one's ear

Also, lend an ear. Pay attention, listen, as in "Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears" (Shakespeare, Julius Caesar, 3:2). This idiom may be obsolescent. [Late 1300s]
See also: ear, lend

lend a hand

To be of assistance.
See also: hand, lend

lend (itself) to

To accommodate or offer itself to; be suitable for: "The presidency does not lend itself to on the job training" (Joe Biden).
See also: lend
References in classic literature ?
You little guessed How deep it drained my slender store: But there's a heart within this breast, And I WILL LEND YOU FIFTY MORE
The one, that the tooth of usury be grinded, that it bite not too much; the other, that there be left open a means, to invite moneyed men to lend to the merchants, for the continuing and quickening of trade.
Secondly, let there be certain persons licensed, to lend to known merchants, upon usury at a higher rate; and let it be with the cautions following.
He lent us the money to become our creditor; and he lends us the yacht to give another handle to the people who are saying already that he occupies the position in our family which is more fully recognized on the other side of the Channel
As this is one of those deep observations which very few readers can be supposed capable of making themselves, I have thought proper to lend them my assistance; but this is a favour rarely to be expected in the course of my work.
I have come, sir," he said, "to ask you to lend me some money.
Luker informed me, sir, that he had no money to lend.
But I never lend it to strangers, and I never lend it on such a security as you have produced.
Supposing, sir, it had been possible (and customary) for you to lend me the money," he said, "in what space of time would it have been possible