leg


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References in classic literature ?
For reply, the old man half-turned, and, on his crutch, swinging his stump of leg in the air, began sidling hippity-hop into the grass hut.
The clay pipe smoked utterly out, the old black, by aid of the crutch, with amazing celerity raised himself upstanding on his one leg and hobbled, with his hippity-hop, to the beach.
His head and arms and legs were jointed upon his body, but he stood perfectly motionless, as if he could not stir at all.
He said we were lacking in understanding, because we had only one leg to a person.
The Saw-Horse paid no attention whatever to this command, and the next instant brought one of his wooden legs down upon Tip's foot so forcibly that the boy danced away in pain to a safer distance, from where he again yelled:
There was much hair on their chests and shoulders, and on the outsides of their arms and legs.
There's nothing against him yet,' returned the man with the wooden leg.
Then he stretched himself out behind a snuff-box that lay on the table; from thence he could watch the dainty little lady, who continued to stand on one leg without losing her balance.
This was as exasperating as the real thing, for each time Daylight was fooled into tightening his leg grip and into a general muscular tensing of all his body.
The bones of her legs below the knees looked no thicker than a finger from in front, but were extraordinarily thick seen from the side.
Hain't we got to saw the leg of Jim's bed off, so as to get the chain loose?
he was about my age, when, setting out one day for the chase, he felt his legs weak, the man who had never known what weakness was before.
Why, I'm glad now I lost my legs for a while, for you never, never know how perfectly lovely legs are till you haven't got them--that go, I mean.
The wild-dog was what he was, a wild-dog, cringing and sneaking, his ears for ever down, his tail for ever between his legs, for ever apprehending fresh misfortune and ill-treatment to fall on him, for ever fearing and resentful, fending off threatened hurt with lips curling malignantly from his puppy fangs, cringing under a blow, squalling his fear and his pain, and ready always for a treacherous slash if luck and safety favoured.
The farmer slowly felt my legs, which were much swelled and strained; then he looked at my mouth.