leech

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Related to leeches: Medicinal leeches

leech

1. noun A person who preys or overly depends upon another, or who clings to another in an parasitic manner. Her younger brother is a bit of a leech, always hanging around us and asking for money.
2. verb To cling to or overly depend upon another person in a parasitic manner, like a leech. She's always leeching off the work other people do in the office.
References in periodicals archive ?
Pyle says that some Sudbury-area lakes have up to 30 ppb copper concentrations--and no leeches.
Comment: The medicinal use of leeches peaked in the mid-1800s but began increasing in the 1960s.
Leeches were used by doctors for centuries, but the practice died out early in the 1900s.
Although there is no indication of how leeches were stored in the house, it is thought that there would have been special containers of moist turf, moss or water.
Leeches are now used in a large number of clinics in Europe and the US to assist healing after plastic and microsurgery.
It is not the initial sucking of the leeches, however, that is their main therapeutic value.
The seasonal occurrence of leeches on the wood turtle, Clemmys insculpta (Reptilia, Testudines, Emydidae).
The leeches often feared by humans for their blood sucking power, embody chemical enzymes which can work as a catalyst in treatment of human ailments, by firstly diluting blood clots in infected body part, reducing the pain of the diseased portion and ultimately improving the blood circulation in the infected area, and helped to cure 60 to 75 per cent of the disease.
Biopharm Leeches is one of the largest commercial leech farms in the world and was set up in Swansea in 1983 by American "leechologist" Dr Roy Sawyer.
The movie incorporates animals liberally, from lobsters to leeches.
Improvements in surgical techniques and antibiotics displaced maggot therapy, as earlier advances had largely supplanted the medical use of leeches (see box, page 267).
The medicinal use of leeches began in ancient Egypt some 2,500 years ago, when bloodletting was considered a useful treatment for assorted maladies such as fever and phlebitis.
It may turn your stomach, but up-to-date doctors across the nation are taking a new look at the healing power of "folk" remedies like leeches and maggots (caterpillar-like fly larvae).