References in classic literature ?
If you told him to stay up there, and go to sleep alone, make him do it, or he will never learn to mind you.
It was not, however, until we were all in a first-class carriage and well started upon our journey to Birmingham that I was able to learn what the trouble was which had driven him to Sherlock Holmes.
A friend came to me the other day and urged me very eloquently to learn some wonderful system by which you never forgot anything.
Those who are esteemed umpires of taste are often persons who have acquired some knowledge of admired pictures or sculptures, and have an inclination for whatever is elegant; but if you inquire whether they are beautiful souls, and whether their own acts are like fair pictures, you learn that they are selfish and sensual.
One learns many things then," she added with a certain pride.
When he grows up to manhood, he learns that his alleged are not his real parents; but who the real are he is unable to discover.
Though conscious of the difficulty of learning without a teacher, I set out with high hope, and a fixed purpose, at whatever cost of trou- ble, to learn how to read.
Also, have you thought what your superiors will say of you when they come to learn the true reason of your absence?
But if the task were, not to write off the English Bible, but to learn a language utterly unlike all other tongues, a language which hitherto had never been learned, except by the Indians themselves, from their mothers' lips,--a language never written, and the strange words of which seemed inexpressible by letters,--if the task were, first to learn this new variety of speech, and then to translate the Bible into it, and to do it so carefully that not one idea throughout the holy book should be changed,--what would induce you to undertake this toil?
She said that I must spend that time amongst her pupils to learn their characters, to be AU COURANT with everything that was passing in the house, to become interested in what interested her, to be able to give her my opinion on knotty points when she required it, and this she did constantly, never allowing my interest in the pupils to fall asleep, and never making any change of importance without my cognizance and consent.
I hed to learn too, but I wasn't more than eight years old when I got my schoolin'.
Yes, and thou must learn how to make pictures of roads and mountains and rivers to carry these pictures in thine eye till a suitable time comes to set them upon paper.
An aged count once lived in Switzerland, who had an only son, but he was stupid, and could learn nothing.
From the time that I can remember having any thoughts about anything, I recall that I had an intense longing to learn to read.
There are heaps of things you never learn at school,'"