lean on


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lean on someone

Fig. to try to make someone do something; to coerce someone to do something. (From lean on someone or something.) If she refuses to do it, lean on her a bit. Don't lean on me! I don't have to do it if I don't want to.
See also: lean, on

lean on someone or something

 
1. Lit. to incline or press on someone or something. Don't lean on me. I'm not strong enough to support both of us. Lean on the wall and rest a little while.
2. Fig. to depend on someone or something. You lean on your parents too much. You must be more independent. You can't lean on the government forever.
See also: lean, on

lean on somebody/something

1. to depend on someone or something The children leaned on each other for help and comfort. Verplank leaned on his experience as a waiter to figure out how to behave when he met the prince.
2. to put pressure on someone or something to get what you want The Spanish teacher had to lean on the school principal to get new textbooks for the class.
See also: lean, on

lean on

1. Rely on, depend on, as in He's leaning on me for help. [Mid-1400s]
2. Exert pressure on one, especially to obtain something or make one do something against his or her will. For example, The gangsters were leaning on local storekeepers to pay them protection money. [Colloquial; mid-1900s]
See also: lean, on

lean on

v.
1. To rest on or be supported by something: I leaned on the crutch to rest my injured foot.
2. To place something so that it rests on or is supported by some other thing: Don't lean the ladder on the awning—you might damage it.
3. To rely on someone for assistance or support: When I became sick, I leaned on my family for support.
4. Slang To pressure someone to do something: The mobsters leaned on the store owner to sell his business.
See also: lean, on