leading

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lead nowhere

To ultimately yield or achieve no useful, beneficial, or successful result or outcome. This meeting is leading nowhere. We've been here for over two hours now and haven't even been able to come up with a name for our product! It appears that talks between Democrats and Republicans on a compromised spending bill have led nowhere.
See also: lead, nowhere

leading edge

1. adjective (hyphenated and used before a noun) Of or being the most advanced position, practice, or technology in a given area, activity, or endeavor. Scientists at the local university are pioneering the nation's most leading-edge cancer research. The company has released some of the most leading-edge smartphones in the world.
2. noun The most advanced position, practice, or technology in a given area, activity, or endeavor. The work their organization is doing at the moment is the leading edge of public health. Anthony's fascination with gadgetry always has him at the leading edge of the latest technology.
See also: edge, leading

on the leading edge

Having or knowledgeable of the most advanced technology in a given area, activity, or endeavor. The local university's laboratory is on the leading edge when it comes to cancer research. Their latest smartphone is truly on the leading edge.
See also: edge, leading, on

lead (one) around by the nose

To exert a high degree of control over someone else. I can't stand the way your mother leads you around by the nose like that and tells you what to do!
See also: around, lead, nose

lead a cat and dog life

Of spouses or romantic partners, to have a life together typified by arguments, fights, and disagreements. They were so happy when they first started dating, but after 10 years together, they've started leading a cat and dog life.
See also: and, cat, dog, lead, life

lead the line

To be the first person in a line of people. All right, kids, who wants to lead the line when we walk to lunch today?
See also: lead, line

lead (one) to the altar

To marry someone. I can't believe it's only a month until I lead her to the altar!
See also: altar, lead

leading light

A person who is well-respected and viewed as important to a group. As a leading light of the human rights organization, he helped improve working conditions for millions of people around the world.
See also: leading, light

The blind leading the blind

Prov. Someone who is not capable of dealing with a situation is guiding someone else who is not capable of dealing with it. (See also .) Jill: Mike is helping me fill out my tax forms this year. Jane: Is he a tax expert? Jill: He read a book about income tax once. Jane: Sounds to me like the blind leading the blind. Nathan offered to be my guide through Philadelphia, but since he'd never been there before either, it was a case of the blind leading the blind.
See also: blind, leading

case of the blind leading the blind

Fig. a situation where people who don't know how to do something try to teach other people. Tom doesn't know anything about cars, but he's trying to teach Sally how to change the oil. It's a case of the blind leading the blind. When I tried to show Mary how to use a computer, it was a case of the blind leading the blind.
See also: blind, case, leading, of

leading question

a question that suggests the kind of answer that the person who asks it wants to hear. The mayor was angered by the reporter's leading questions. "Don't you think that the police are failing to stop crime?" is an example of a leading question.
See also: leading, question

on the bleeding edge

 and on the leading edge
having the most advanced technology; knowing about the most advanced technology. (Alludes to the cutting edge of a sword.) This gadget is brand new. It's really on the bleeding edge. Tom is on the leading edge when it comes to optical storage technology.
See also: bleeding, edge, on

the blind leading the blind

a situation where someone is trying to show someone else how to do something which they do not know how to do themselves I tried to explain how the software works, but it was a case of the blind leading the blind, really.
See fly blind, turn a blind eye, swear blind
See also: blind, leading

a leading light

an important and respected person in a group or organization (often + in ) A leading light in the art and ballet world, he was a close friend of Princess Diana. (often + of ) Jeffries, at 23 a leading light of the campaign, was the first to speak.
See also: leading, light

blind leading the blind

Those lacking the skills or knowledge for something are being guided by equally inept individuals. For example, Bill's teaching his son carpentry; that's a case of the blind leading the blind. The expression is found in the New Testament as one of Jesus's teachings (Matthew 15:14; Luke 6:39). [c. 1600]
See also: blind, leading

leading light

An important or influential individual, as in Jim was a leading light in his community. This expression, alluding to moral guidance, dates from about 1870, but terms such as a shining light have been used for an outstanding person since the first half of the 1500s.
See also: leading, light

leading question

A question worded so as to elicit particular information or a particular answer, as in When are you selling the business? This example assumes that the person is going to sell the business, an action that may not have been established or revealed. This expression originated with a specific meaning in law, that is, "a question that guides a witness toward a desired answer." In court, this practice is called leading a witness and is forbidden. [Mid-1800s]
See also: leading, question

on the bleeding edge

phr. having the most advanced technology; knowing about the most advanced technology. (Jocular. More advanced than on the cutting edge.) Tom is on the bleeding edge when it comes to optical storage technology.
See also: bleeding, edge, on