lay off

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lay off

1. verb To end someone's employment, usually due to a significant change in the company. A noun or pronoun can be used between "lay" and "off." How many people do you think will be laid off in this merger? I figured they would lay me off, I just didn't think it would be this soon.
2. verb To stop bothering someone or leave them alone. Lay off, will you? I'm working as fast as I can! Hey, lay off your brother, OK? Please don't be so rough with him.
3. verb To stop doing or using something. Well, you need to lay off the chocolates if you want to lose weight!
4. verb To designate the boundaries of something. Where is the pool going to go? Have you laid off that part of the yard yet?
5. noun The act of ending someone's employment, usually due to a significant change in the company. In this usage, the phrase is usually written as one word ("layoff"). Do you think this merger will be accompanied by layoffs?
6. noun A period of inactivity. In this usage, the phrase is usually written as one word ("layoff"). The team was rusty after such a long layoff between games.
See also: lay, off

lay someone off (from something)

to put an end to someone's employment at something. The automobile factory laid five hundred people off from work. They laid off a lot of people. We knew they were going to lay a lot of people off.
See also: lay, off

lay off (someone or something)

to leave someone or something alone. Lay off the booze for a while, why don't ya? Lay off me! I didn't do anything!
See also: lay, off

lay off

((of) someone or something) to stop doing something to someone or something; to stop bothering someone or something. (Of is usually retained before pronouns.) Lay off of me! You've said enough. Please lay off the chicken. I cooked it as best I could.
See also: lay, off

lay off

1. Terminate a person from employment. For example, When they lost the contract, they had to lay off a hundred workers. This expression formerly referred to temporary dismissals, as during a recession, with the idea that workers would be hired back when conditions improved, but with the tendency of businesses to downsize in the 1990s it came to mean "terminate permanently." [First half of 1800s]
2. Mark off the boundaries, as in Let's lay off an area for a flower garden. [Mid-1700s]
3. Stop doing something, quit, as in Lay off that noise for a minute, so the baby can get to sleep, or She resolved to lay off smoking. [Early 1900s]
4. Stop bothering or annoying someone, as in Lay off or I'll tell the teacher. [Slang; c. 1900]
5. Place all or part of a bet with another bookmaker so as to reduce the risk. For example, Some bookmakers protect themselves by laying off very large bets with other bookmakers. [Mid-1900s]
See also: lay, off

lay off

v.
1. To terminate someone's employment, especially temporarily; suspend someone from work: The company had to lay off two dozen workers or it would have gone bankrupt. They had to lay the clerk off for stealing mail.
2. To mark the boundaries of some region and reserve that region; mark something off: We laid off the front part of the yard for a garden and left the back for a lawn. We used lime to lay the field off for the game.
3. To stop using or doing something: I'm going to have to lay off the cigarettes; they're making me sick.
4. Slang To stop bothering someone. Used chiefly as an angry command: Look, I'm trying to work, so just lay off me, okay?
See also: lay, off

lay off

verb
See also: lay, off
References in periodicals archive ?
Under a seniority-based layoff policy, these schools stand to lose the largest share of their teachers.
Merit compensation system employees facing layoff shall be offered any vacant position that exists for the same title held by the laid off employee and within the same agency and county in which the employee is employed.
As time passed and conditions actually worsened, more layoffs followed.
He assured residents that no union would suffer significant layoffs and that all layoffs would be prevented, if possible.
There are also a few legal distinctions between layoffs and terminations.
Our results were consistent with the view that layoffs create shareholder value," Rennie said.
Palmdale Elementary Teachers Association President Simone Zulu said the layoffs will affect morale.
Work with employees to avoid layoffs and voluntary quits.
The report measured job loss at companies employing at least 50 workers, where at least 50 people filed for unemployment insurance during a five-week period, and the layoff lasted more than 30 days, so layoffs at smaller companies is not reflected.
According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, downsizing activities in the United States have exceeded two million job cuts in both 2001 and 2002 ("Mass Layoff Statistics," 2002).
However, because it is not economically feasible to keep the mine running at the same level, a newly revised plan was developed that included layoffs to begin by year-end 2003, with another similar layoff to be expected in 2005.
One HR manager said that bosses making layoff decisions go first for the loners because getting rid of them does no damage to the body politic.
It remains to be seen whether this is an indication that office markets are on the verge of a sustainable recovery or simply experiencing a lull prior to further layoff an nouncements in the fourth quarter," read part of Cushman & Wakefield's research report.