in layman's terms

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in layman's terms

In words that can be understood by people outside of a given profession or field of expertise, i.e., without the use of jargon or highly technical terms. Chronic atherosclerosis in the coronary arteries has stopped oxygen-rich blood from reaching the heart, leading to a myocardial infarction. In layman's terms, you've suffered a heart attack. I wish these software agreements would be written in layman's terms, rather than this legalese gobbledygook.
See also: term
References in classic literature ?
Lydgate was a natural son of Bulstrode's, a fact which seemed to justify her suspicions of evangelical laymen.
only I admit it is slow for the laymen whose fate it sometimes is to sit by and listen.
Some years before his death, with characteristic energy and zeal, he had begun to spread his doctrines by sending out 'poor priests' and laymen who, practicing the self-denying life of the friars of earlier days, founded the Lollard sect.
This intimation, delivered in Norman-English with a firm voice and a stern aspect, made the Jew shrink back; and he would have probably withdrawn himself altogether from a vicinity so dangerous, had not the attention of every one been called to the sudden entrance of Prince John, who at that moment entered the lists, attended by a numerous and gay train, consisting partly of laymen, partly of churchmen, as light in their dress, and as gay in their demeanour, as their companions.
So the holy men came to the church; the Bishop and the Prior jesting and laughing between themselves about certain fair dames, their words more befitting the lips of laymen, methinks, than holy clerks.
As to adults, laymen that is to say, he had never touched them.
Save a herdsman, who seemed to have caught something of the nature and expression of the beasts he tended, they met no one until they approached the village, where, on the brow of an acclivity, masculine humanity appeared in the shape of two curates: one tall, thin, close-shaven, with a book under his arm, and his neck craned forward; the other middle-sized, robust, upright, and aggressive, with short black whiskers, and an air of protest against such notions as that a clergyman may not marry, hunt, play cricket, or share the sports of honest laymen.