lawn


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

lawn

n. poor quality marijuana. (Drugs.) This isn’t good grass; it’s lawn.

mow the lawn

and mow one’s lawn
tv. to comb one’s hair. I’ll be with you as soon as I mow the lawn. Don’t you think you better mow your lawn?
See also: lawn, mow

mow one’s lawn

verb
See also: lawn, mow

lawn jockey

A derogatory term for an African-American. A traditional feature of a Southern front yard was a statue of a diminutive black man painted in the colors of horseracing silks. His hand was outstretched, as if to hitch a horse's reins (the hand often ended in a ring for just that purpose). As an expression connoting subservience in the sense of “slave” or “mascot,” “lawn jockey” deserved to be consigned to the linguistic scrap heap.
See also: jockey, lawn
References in classic literature ?
I think that I have seen enough now, Miss Stoner, and with your permission we shall walk out upon the lawn.
Your own feelings overcame you, and you ran across the lawn and broke in upon them.
But all these abstractions and eliminations made of his mind a rather empty and echoing place, and he supposed that was one of the reasons why the busy animated people on the Beaufort lawn shocked him as if they had been children playing in a grave-yard.
He tried to outrun her by leaving the drive and circling across the lawn but she ran on the inner and smaller circle, and was always there, facing him with her two rows of gleaming teeth.
Still undecided what to do next, her interest was excited by the appearance of one of the servants on the lawn.
On the side of the lawn a label informed him that he was not to walk on the grass.
This done, she returns to the garden, and approaches the mysterious figure on the lawn.
He saw the figure of a man moving rapidly across the lawn toward the building--saw it ascend the steps; then a projection of the wall concealed it.
I left the lawn and moved in the white light and silence along the road, aimless and sorrowing.
Outside the summer-house, seen through three arched openings, the cool green prospect of a lawn led away, in the distance, to flower-beds and shrubberies, and, farther still, disclosed, through a break in the trees, a grand stone house which closed the view, with a fountain in front of it playing in the sun.
There was an orchard behind it, and a nicely kept lawn before it, but, somehow, there was a certain bareness about it.
I don't remember any time quite so perfect since the days when I was too little to do lessons and was turned out with sugar on my eleven o'clock bread and butter on to a lawn closely strewn with dandelions and daisies.
A tall figure in blue was striding across the lawn towards the study door; a glint of moonlit silver on his facings picked him out as Commandant O'Brien.
In the midst of the grove was a fine lawn, sloping down towards the house, near the summit of which rose a plentiful spring, gushing out of a rock covered with firs, and forming a constant cascade of about thirty feet, not carried down a regular flight of steps, but tumbling in a natural fall over the broken and mossy stones till it came to the bottom of the rock, then running off in a pebly channel, that with many lesser falls winded along, till it fell into a lake at the foot of the hill, about a quarter of a mile below the house on the south side, and which was seen from every room in the front.
Then she walked off the lawn to the meadow, whose corner to the right I can just see.