late


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fashionably late

Arriving after the arranged time to a meeting or event that does not require strict punctuality, especially so as to give the appearance of nonchalance or having been preoccupied by other social engagements. A: "John's party is starting in 20 minutes, so we'd better get moving soon!" B: "No one will even be there by then. Haven't you ever heard of being fashionably late?" Mary doesn't like to appear overeager when she goes to parties, so she always makes a point of being fashionably late.
See also: late

late model

Especially regarding an automobile, of a relatively recent design or model. After I got my promotion, I decided to trade in my clunky old Volkswagen for a snazzy, late model sedan.
See also: late, model

a day late and a dollar short

Too late to be of any benefit. Jake tried to repair his relationship with his girlfriend after forgetting her birthday, but she viewed his efforts as a day late and a dollar short.
See also: and, dollar, late, short

It is never too late

It is never impossible (to do something), regardless of how old one is. The phrase is typically used to encourage someone to try to accomplish something, especially late in life or long after it is usually accomplished by others. My grandmother got her master's degree at age 85, proving that it is never too late to accomplish your goals. You can still achieve the life you want. It is never too late.
See also: late, never

better late than never

The delayed occurrence or achievement of something that one desires is better than it not happening at all. This set phrase is often used to acknowledge (perhaps begrudgingly) that something has finally occurred. After two weeks, I finally got a return phone call from that company. Better late than never, I guess. I'm sorry my gift came late, but better late than never, right?
See also: better, late, never

Better late than never.

Prov. Cliché Doing something late is better than not doing it. I'm sorry I'm late to the party. Better late than never, right? Jill: Lisa's birthday was two weeks ago. Should I send her a card now? Jane: Better late than never.
See also: better, late, never

day late and a dollar short

late and ill-prepared. Tommy, you seem to show up a day late and a dollar short all the time. You need to get organized.
See also: and, dollar, late, short

It is never too late to learn.

 and You are never too old to learn.
Prov. You can always learn something new. Alan: Help me make the salad dressing. Jane: But I don't know anything about making salad dressing. Alan: You are never too old to learn. Grandma decided to take a course in using computers. "It's never too late to learn," she said.
See also: late, learn, never

It is never too late to mend.

Prov. It is never too late to apologize for something you have done or try to repair something you have done wrong. Sue: I still miss Tony, but it's been a year since our big fight and we haven't spoken to each other since. Mother: Well, it's never too late to mend; why don't you call him up and apologize?
See also: late, mend, never

keep late hours

to stay up or stay out until very late at night. I'm always tired because I keep late hours. If I didn't keep late hours, I wouldn't sleep so late in the morning.
See also: hour, keep, late

late bloomer

 
1. Lit. a plant that blooms later than similar plants or that blooms late in the season. There are a few late bloomers in the garden, but by fall, we don't care much anymore about flowers.
2. Fig. a person who finally develops a useful or superior skill or talents later than expected or desired. Joseph was a late bloomer, but turned out to be a formidable scholar in the long run.
See also: late

late in life

Fig. when one is old. Grandma injured her hip running. She's exercising rather late in life. Isn't it sort of late in life for your grandparents to buy a house?
See also: late, life

late in the day

Fig. far along in a project or activity; too late in a project or activity for action, decisions, etc., to be taken. It was a bit late in the day for him to apologize. It's late in the day to try to change the plans.
See also: late

late unpleasantness

Euph. the U.S. Civil War. (Old.) The town courthouse was burned in the late unpleasantness. Many of my ancestors lost their lives in the late unpleasantness.
See also: late

of late

lately. Have you seen Sally of late? We haven't had an opportunity to eat out of late.
See also: late, of

stay up late

to remain awake and out of bed later than usual. I am in the practice of staying up late. I can't stay up late three nights in a row.
See also: late, stay, up

too little, too late

Prov. Not enough help to save the situation, and arriving too late. After a lifetime of bad diet and no exercise, Lorna tried to save her health by improving her habits, but it was too little, too late. Fred: I know how to keep my business from going bankrupt. I'll invest all my savings in it. Bill: I'm sorry, Fred; even that much would be too little, too late.
See also: late

better late than never

it is good this happened now although it should have happened sooner I guess it's better late than never, but getting the award after he died strikes me as less than satisfactory.
See also: better, late, never

a day late and a dollar short

not enough to be useful The government's attempts at reform were a day late and a dollar short.
See also: and, dollar, late, short

late in the day

delayed almost too long Isn't it rather late in the day to say you're sorry?
See also: late

of late

(slightly formal)
recently She hasn't been feeling well of late.
See also: late, of

too little, too late

not enough and not given soon enough to be useful Financial help for food pantries and soup kitchens may be too little, too late.
See also: late

Better late than never.

something that you say which means it is better for someone or something to be late than never to arrive or to happen 'Karen's card arrived 2 weeks after my birthday.' 'Oh well, better late than never.'
See also: better, late, never

late in the day

too late to be useful (often + for ) The new gun laws came a little late in the day for those whose friends or families were killed in the massacre. (often + to do sth) It seems rather late in the day to announce that diet drinks might cause cancer.
See Better late than never
See also: late

too little, too late

if the help that is given to a person is described as too little, too late, there is not enough of it and it was given too late to be useful The government have finally decided to put some money into research but it's too little, too late.
See also: late

better late than never

Being tardy is better than not at all, as in We've been waiting for you for an hour-but better late than never. This phrase, first recorded about 1200, appears in several early English proverb collections, often with the added but better never late. Today it is often used in exasperation over a delay, as in the example.
See also: better, late, never

keep late hours

Stay awake until late at night. For example, Never call Ethel before noon; she keeps late hours and sleeps all morning.
See also: hour, keep, late

late in life

In old age. For example, Isn't it rather late in life for your grandmother to go trekking in Nepal?
See also: late, life

late in the day

Far advanced; also, too far advanced. For example, It's late in the day to change the kitchen layout, since we've already ordered the cabinets , or It's a bit late in the day for apologizing. [Late 1700s]
See also: late

of late

Recently, lately, as in She's been very quiet of late; is something wrong? This idiom uses late as a noun instead of an adjective, a usage dating from about 1250. The idiom dates from the early 1400s.
See also: late, of

too little, too late

Inadequate as a remedy and not in time to be effective, as in The effort to divert the stream into a corn field was too little too late-the houses were already flooded . This term originated in the military, where it was applied to reinforcements that were insufficient and arrived too late to be of help. [First half of 1900s]
See also: late

Later

and Late and Laters
interj. Good-bye. It’s time to cruise. Later. CU. Laters.

Late

verb
See Later

of late

Recently; lately: was feeling better of late.
See also: late, of
References in periodicals archive ?
Once again, we find it is sole traders and smaller firms which are facing the brunt of late payments and this is putting viable businesses at risk of closure.
Rip Michels, the 2006 Southwest Series champ, is returning to the Super Late Model ranks in a Ford Fusion for the Sunrise Ford Racing Team owned by Bob Bruncati.
Using univariate analysis, we found that patients with late recognition of SARS were more likely to have no known contact with another SARS patient (p < 0.
All told, the material actually suggests that Michelangelo, while important in terms of reputation, was merely one of many names, styles and conceptual ideas that were manipulated in late sixteenth-century Florence.
What of the late 1990s financial market mania and stock market bust?
The Sheridan youngster, appropriately, is a son of Late Late Show and Mossley Jo whelped in September 02.
Among respondents with AIDS, 24% were classified as early testers and 45% were classified as late testers; the 21% who tested positive for HIV more than one year but less than five years before AIDS diagnosis and the 8% for whom it was not possible to determine the relationship between HIV testing and AIDS diagnosis dates were excluded.
It is also commonplace in the dental profession for no-show patients or those making late cancellations to be charged if they abuse the appointment privilege.
Paying creditors late can seriously damage or even destroy business relationships, according to the latest figures from Clearlybusiness.
The distribution of hydrogen and water beneath Earth's surface suggests to many geochemists that water hasn't mixed deep into the planet, so they thought that the cometary bombardment applied a veneer of water to the dry planet relatively late in its formative period.
17, 2001 and will be deemed to have reasonable cause for such late filing.
They will be enthusiastically welcomed only if we first connect the problems and solutions they address to the financial mindset of late adulthood, and the real-world emotional, sociological and philosophical issues, fears, and concerns our seniors are facing.
Late August, Early September follows several thirty-something intellectuals - in particular Gabriel, a budding writer - as they grapple with the terminal illness of a slightly older member of their circle, the novelist Adrien.
Sometimes, it is followed by late in-mold inoculation.