lash

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Related to lashed: lashed out

a lash of scorpions

1. literal A whipping implement made of scorpion tails—an ancient method of punishment. I was watching this old movie, and one character started beating another with a lash of scorpions! I couldn't believe the one guy was getting hit with scorpion tails—eek!
2. figurative An extremely harsh punishment. If my parents find out that I borrowed their car last night without their permission, I am going to get a lash of scorpions!
See also: lash, of

lash out

1. To physically swing or strike out at someone or something, usually unexpectedly. That ornery old cat will lash out at you if you get too close.
2. To react with sudden, intense anger. Hey, don't lash out at me, I'm just the messenger! I couldn't help but lash out when I heard about the latest printing mishap.
See also: lash, out

by an eyelash

By an extremely short or slim margin (of distance, time, or another measure). They're just about to close the gates! It looks like we made the flight by an eyelash. The race was neck and neck till the very end, but Sally won it by an eyelash.
See also: eyelash

have a lash at (something)

To try something (often for the first time). Primarily heard in Australia, New Zealand. A: "Do you want to try driving my car, to see how you like it?" B: "Yeah, sure, I'll have a lash at it." I don't usually like hot tea, but it's so cold out that I had a lash at it today.
See also: have, lash

lash against something

[for something, such as wind or water] to beat or whip heavily against something. The angry waves lashed against the hull of the boat, frightening the people huddled inside. The wind lashed against the house and kept us awake all night.
See also: lash

lash at someone or something

to thrash or beat someone or something violently. The rain lashed at the windows. The mule driver lashed at his beasts with his whip.
See also: lash

lash back (at someone or something)

to strike or fight back against someone or something—physically or verbally. Randy lashed back at his attackers and drove them away. If you threaten Fred, he'll lash back.
See also: back, lash

lash down on someone or something

[for rain] to beat down on someone or something. The wind and rain lashed down on us. The rain lashed down on the young plants and pounded them into the soil.
See also: down, lash, on

lash into (someone or an animal)

to attack someone or an animal—physically or verbally. Dad lashed into my brother, who had smashed up the car again. Walter lashed into the cat for tearing the upholstery.
See also: lash

lash into something

to begin to eat something with vigor. Mary lashed into the huge ice cream sundae, and ate almost the whole thing. The workers lashed into their lunches and did not say a word until they had finished.
See also: lash

lash out (at someone or something)

 and lash out (against someone or something)
to strike out in defense or attack—physically or verbally. Amy was angry with Ed and lashed out at him just to show who was boss. She was so angry with him that she just lashed out against him. Gretchen was fed up with the cat and lashed out savagely in her anger.
See also: lash, out

lash someone or something down

to tie someone or something down. The villain lashed Nell down to the railroad tracks. He lashed down the innocent victim. Lash that cask down so it doesn't wash overboard.
See also: down, lash

lash someone or something to something

to tie someone or something to something. The boys lashed one of their number to a tree and danced around him like savages. Abe lashed the cask to the deck. Frank lashed himself to the mast.
See also: lash

lash something about

to whip or fling something about violently. The big cat lashed its tail threateningly. The strong wind lashed the tall grass about.
See also: lash

lash something together

to tie something or things together. Let's lash these logs together and make a raft. Lash two or three of the poles together to make them stronger.
See also: lash, together

lash out

Make a sudden blow or fierce verbal attack. For example, The mule lashed out with its hind legs, or After listening to Dad's criticism of his driving, Arthur lashed out at him. [Second half of 1500s]
See also: lash, out

have a lash at something

AUSTRALIAN, INFORMAL
If you have a lash at something, you attempt to do it. He had been climbing for years and decided to have a lash at Everest.
See also: have, lash, something

by an eyelash

by a very small margin.
See also: eyelash

have a lash at

make an attempt at; have a go at. Australian & New Zealand
See also: have, lash

lash out

v.
1. To aim a sudden blow; strike: The horse lashed out with its hind legs.
2. To make a scathing verbal or written attack on someone or something: The mayor lashed out at her critics during the interview. The defendant lashed out when asked about his arrest record.
See also: lash, out
References in periodicals archive ?
2 : to move forcefully from side to side <The animal lashed his tail about.
4 : to make a sudden and angry attack against <He lashed out at his critics.
The patrol boats are then lashed to the deck and the cradle, and the cradle is lashed and spot-welded to the deck so (the load) will be very secure once underway.
Tomorrow morning after it's lashed down, that patrol boat will look like it has a spider web all over it," the Coast Guard officer said.
25, Boots 10 score9/ Get Lashed Lash Boost serum To help nourish frail and brittle lashes for strength and growth.
Nails Inc now offers a service called Get Lashed - a comprehensive menu of 16 types of lashes which cost from pounds 7.