larger


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Related to larger: larger than life

be larger than life

To be (or seem) more important, impressive, or exciting than the average person or thing. Celebrities are always larger than life to their fans. Have you seen the new stadium? It really seems like it's larger than life when you're inside.
See also: larger, life

larger than life

More important, impressive, or exciting than the average person or thing. Celebrities are always larger than life to their fans. Have you seen the new stadium? It really seems like it's larger than life when you're inside.
See also: larger, life

*big as life (and twice as ugly)

 and *large as life (and twice as ugly); bigger than life (and twice as ugly)
Cliché a colorful way of saying that a person or a thing appeared, often surprisingly or dramatically, in a particular place. (*Also: as ~.) The little child just stood there as big as life and laughed very hard. I opened the door, and there was Tom as large as life. I came home and found this cat in my chair, as big as life and twice as ugly.
See also: big, life

*large as life

Fig. in person; actually, and sometimes surprisingly, present at a place. (*Also: as ~.) I thought Jack was away, but there he was as large as life. Jean was not expected to appear, but she turned up large as life.
See also: large, life

larger than life

Fig. [of someone] having an aura of greatness, perhaps not supported by the real person. Perry seemed larger than life to those who had only read about him. To the rest of us, he was a boor. To the children, the star athlete who spoke at the school assembly seemed larger than life.
See also: larger, life

big as life

Also, large as life. In person, as in And there was Mary, big as life, standing right in front of me. This phrase transfers the same size as in real life (life-size) to an actual appearance. Sometimes this term is embellished with and quite as natural, presumably alluding to a likeness of a person or thing that closely resembles the real thing. A similar addition is and twice as natural, which doesn't make sense. [Late 1800s]
2. Also, larger than life; big as all outdoors. On a grand scale, as in The soap opera could well be called a larger-than-life drama, or That friend of his was as big as all outdoors. This phrase can be used either literally, for larger than life-size (second example) or figuratively. The phrase all outdoors has been used to compare something or someone to an immensity since the early 1800s.
See also: big, life

large as life

Also, larger than life. See big as life.
See also: large, life

large as life

BRITISH, AMERICAN or

big as life

AMERICAN
If you say that someone is somewhere, large as life, you mean that you are surprised and sometimes shocked to see them there. And now she was back, large as life, to claim her inheritance. Amos walked big as life into the diner and took his time over the menu.
See also: large, life

larger than life

BRITISH, AMERICAN or

bigger than life

AMERICAN
COMMON If you describe someone as larger than life, you mean that they have a very strong personality and behave in a way that makes people notice them. She was larger than life yet intensely human, brilliant yet warm. He's bigger than life, and she's quiet and humble. Note: Larger-than-life is often used before nouns. John Huston was a larger-than-life character, whose temperament was as dramatic as any of the characters in his own films.
See also: larger, life

large as life

(of a person) conspicuously present. informal
This expression was originally used literally, with reference to the size of a statue or portrait relative to the original: in the mid 18th century Horace Walpole described a painting as being ‘as large as the life’. The humorous mid 19th-century elaboration of the expression, large as life and twice as natural , used by Lewis Carroll and others, is still sometimes found; it is attributed to the Canadian humorist T. C. Haliburton ( 1796–1865 ).
See also: large, life

larger than life

1 (of a person) attracting attention because their appearance or behaviour is more flamboyant than that of ordinary people. 2 (of a thing) seeming disproportionately important.
1996 Face I feel that Keith from The Prodigy has been your best cover this year—he is London, in your face, loud and larger than life.
See also: larger, life

(as) large as ˈlife

(humorous) used of somebody who is seen in person, often unexpectedly: I thought she’d left the country, but there she was, large as life, in the supermarket!
See also: large, life

larger than ˈlife

looking or behaving in a way that is more interesting or exciting than other people, and so is likely to attract attention: He’s one of those larger than life characters.
See also: larger, life
References in periodicals archive ?
Regardless, some funds set community against community and certainly give the advantage to larger centers.
In most dimensions, there is little difference between the G Sedan and its larger M Sedan brother.
As opposed to larger corporations, boutiques have no budget for public relations that they can use to help sell their services, but size has little relevance when it comes to expert services, according to Diane Gordon, licensed real estate sales associate at Lamb Realty, who said brainstorming with other small firms can generate many ways to promote specialized local services.
As this illusion shows, a shape (or portion of food) looks larger when it's on a smaller plate than when it's on a larger plate.
The flap should include larger pedicle vessels (axial branch of the angular artery) to help ensure its survival.
Further, to attempt to explain these boys' selections in this manner may, in fact, be including participants who actually desired to be larger than their present size.
The repeated use of touchstones is an important and effective way to teach and stay focused on larger intentions.
Recyclers say larger machines are just as versatile as their smaller counterparts.
Lovejoy plans to factor skeletal data from these discoveries into a larger examination of ancient sex differences.
Tributary: A stream or river that flows into a larger stream or river.
Indeed, community units may be selected within the larger scale of the study as a whole in two ways: as models that are representative of most study participants (and so have a likelihood of generating hypotheses that may be tested quantitatively across most participants to identify more common contributors) or as efforts to make the cohort more diverse by including participants whose identities contain elements (e.
In which container would you expect water to evaporate, or change from a liquid to a gas, more quickly: one with a larger or smaller surface area (area that is exposed)?
The FedEx court set forth the factors to consider in determining whether costs to repair a component part of a larger piece of property are deductible under Sec.
Larger proportions of Mexican and black mothers than of white mothers were teenagers (11% and 19%, respectively, vs.
For a larger problem to emerge from the widening rift between art and po-mo theory was the question of how to forge fresh kinds of connections between the two, envisaging in new ways how the arts belong to the history of thought and thought to the history of art, in an aesthetic no longer based in the ideas of a disappointed allegory of totality or ironic loss of reality.