land-poor

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land-poor

Owning a large amount of land that is unprofitable and being without the means to maintain it or capitalize on its fertility. My fool of a husband used our savings to buy a big plot of land out west, and we've been land-poor for the last 10 years as a result.
References in classic literature ?
With no business capacity, old and opinionated, he was land poor, and it was an open question which would arrive first, his death or bankruptcy.
As Mansfield (2011: 26) writes, the labour intensive nature of poppy cultivation means that it 'provides opportunities for the land poor to either rent or sharecrop land'.
It proclaims to all who see and partake that land poor gardeners can contribute to the health and nutrition of their families.
The landscape is harsh, the land poor, the climate extreme--small wonder that their folklore relates that the North-West Frontier was formed from the rocks left over once God had made everywhere else; or that, when not struggling to eke out a living from traditional farming and trade, they "engage in less savoury activities, such as smuggling, extortion and the drug trade, to make ends meet", in the Pathan language, the word for 'cousin' is the same as that for 'enemy', which provides another clue to their outlook.
Vineyard owners who are land poor and under financial pressure now have an improved alternative to selling their property to developers.
discussed how "the engine of our prosperity is rooted in the consumption of raw land, and even though most municipalities are now land poor, they are being forced to engage in fiscal zoning because they depend on their own revenue to survive.
Unemployment stimulates activity that tends to land poor people in prison.
Extensive research (Agarwal, 1989; Bhalla, 1989; Chen, 1989; Duvvury, 1989; Kandiyotti, 1990; Roy and Clark, 1994; Roy and Tisdell, 1993a; 1993b; 1997; World Bank, 1990) has shown that since rural women's (especially landless and land poor women) reliance on forests, commons and other natural resources is far greater than men's, effective ownership rights to cultivable land by making women more economically independent significantly reduces their need to rely on forests and natural resources and appropriate user rights to forests provide them with the incentive to preserve as well as increase the supply of natural resources and environment.
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