lame

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lame joke

A joke that is deemed (often by the listener) to be corny or otherwise not amusing. A: "Come on, isn't that funny?" B: "It's kind of a lame joke, mom." My date clearly thinks he's hilarious, but all I heard was a bunch of lame jokes.
See also: joke, lame

lame duck

1. Someone or something that needs help. The company started as a lame duck that was saved by an innovative entrepreneur who decided to take some risks and go in a new direction.
2. An elected official serving their last term in office, usually so-called after a successor has been elected. The opposing party was angry at the president's intention to name a Supreme Court replacement while he was a lame duck.
See also: duck, lame

help a lame dog over a stile

obsolete To help or assist someone in need in some fundamental or basic way. He has so much money that it would be no effort at all for him to help a lame dog over a stile, but the man is adamant that not a penny of his fortune be used towards charity of any kind.
See also: dog, help, lame, over

lame duck

 
1. Fig. someone who is in the last period of a term in an elective office and cannot run for reelection. You can't expect much from a lame duck. As a lame duck, there's not a lot I can do.
2. Fig. having to do with someone in the last period of a term in an elective office. (Used as an adjective; sometimes lame-duck.) You don't expect much from a lame-duck president. Lame-duck Congresses tend to do things they wouldn't dare do otherwise.
See also: duck, lame

lame duck

An elected officeholder whose term of office has not yet expired but who has failed to be re-elected and therefore cannot garner much political support for initiatives. For example, You can't expect a lame duck President to get much accomplished; he's only got a month left in office . This expression originated in the 1700s and then meant a stockbroker who did not meet his debts. It was transferred to officeholders in the 1860s. The Lame Duck Amendment, 20th to the U.S. Constitution, calls for Congress and each new President to take office in January instead of March (as before), thereby eliminating the lame-duck session of Congress.
See also: duck, lame

a lame duck

COMMON
1. If a politician or a government is a lame duck, they have little real power, for example because their period of office is coming to an end. The government is headed by a president who looks like a lame duck. The last thing people needed was to feel that the government was a lame duck. Note: You can also use lame-duck before a noun. He's already seen widely as a lame-duck Prime Minister. He would have found himself leading a lame-duck administration to near-certain defeat.
2. If someone or something is a lame duck, they are in a very weak position and in need of support. The company has completed its transformation from the lame duck of the motor industry into a quality car maker. Moira considers all single people lame ducks. Note: You can also use lame-duck before a noun. It is not right to use taxpayers' money to support lame-duck industries. Note: This expression is usually used to criticize someone or something. Note: The image here is of a duck that has been shot and wounded, and so cannot move properly and is likely to die.
See also: duck, lame

help a lame dog over a stile

come to the aid of a person in need.
See also: dog, help, lame, over

lame duck

a person or thing that is powerless or in need of help. informal
In the mid 18th century, lame duck was used in a stock-market context, with reference to a person or company that could not fulfil their financial obligations. Later, from the mid 19th century, it was used specifically with reference to US politicians in the final period of office, after the election of their successor.
1998 Spectator At some point in his second and final term, every president becomes a lame duck: as the man himself matters less, so does the office.
See also: duck, lame

a ˌlame ˈduck

(informal) a person or an organization that is not very successful and needs help: My uncle is a bit of a lame duck. The family has to help him all the time.The shipping industry had become a lame duck.
See also: duck, lame

lame

and laine and lane
1. mod. inept; inadequate; undesirable. That guy’s so lame, it’s pitiful.
2. n. a square person. (Streets. Underworld.) Let’s see if that lame over there has anything we want in his pockets.
3. n. an inept person. The guy turned out to be a lame, and we had to fire him.

lame duck

1. n. someone who is in the last period of a term in an elective office. You can’t expect much from a lame duck.
2. mod. having to do with someone in the last period of a term in an elective office. You don’t expect much from a lame duck president.
See also: duck, lame

lamebrain

and lame-brain
1. n. a fool. Please don’t call me a lamebrain. I do my best.
2. and lamebrained mod. foolish. No more of your lamebrained ideas!

lame-brain

verb
References in periodicals archive ?
31) Lamer CJC mentions this in Van der Peet, supra note 1 at para 31, again at paras 36-39 citing US and Australian decisions, and further at paras 42-43, 50, 57.
79) The more difficult problem was to determine whether an administrative decision demonstrated adequate regard for Charter values like freedom of expression, a problem which stemmed back to the subtle disagreement between Lamer J and Dickson CJ in Slaight Communications.
As we consider the reasoning of Justice Lamer in BC Motor Vehicle, and the body of case law that continues to develop in its wake, we note that the Court has tried, and is still trying, to mediate between principles of fundamental justice promulgated by the courts, and those asserted by the Canadian public, legislatures and government.
Justice Lamer characterized this test as imposing a lower threshold for exclusion than the "community shock" test accepted by the Court in its pre-Charter decisions.
The new cluster," Lamer says, "can only be explained by the existence of dark energy.
All of this work established, as Lamer shrewdly calls it, the Michael Moore brand--satirical humor grounded not so much in wisecracks or jokes but in the juxtaposition of real words and images that expose falsity and hypocrisy.
En otras palabras, el juez Lamer parece reconocer que un uso que interfiera con el empleo o usufructo tradicional de la tierra podria romper el lazo cultural del que surge el derecho territorial mismo del pueblo aborigen.
Lamer said at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Pain Medicine.
Lamer Alexander appointed Fox to the Tennessee Great Smoky Mountains Park Commission, which he chaired from 1984 to 1986.
As faculty member Fred Lamer put it, "Curriculum should be sensitive to important theoretical and conceptual matters, not just the latest technical trend.
Lamer of the Rosenburg, Oregon, Police Department responded to the scene of a terminated pursuit involving a suspect and other officers.
Lamer went on, as though they must understand: "There's no getting around it.
This article studies the patterns of disagreement of the Supreme Court of Canada under the leadership of Chief Justice Antonio Lamer and considers the effects of judicial disagreement in deriding the role and evaluating the performance of the Court.
It's only five days short of seven years since Sunderland last took anything from the Theatre of Dreams, and each of their defeats since then seemed to be accompanied by lamer and lamer excuses about United's ground being a difficult place to go to.
They credit the work of Christina Lamer, without which they maintain their study could not have been written, but also refine some of her points, especially concerning elite and popular cultures.