lah-di-dah


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lah-di-dah

  (old-fashioned) also la-di-da (old-fashioned)
a woman who is lah-di-dah thinks she is better than other people and tries to speak as if she is from a high social class No one really liked her in the village. They all thought she was a bit lah-di-dah.

lah-di-dah

(ˈlɑˈdiˈdɑ)
1. mod. casual; relaxed and uncaring. She’s not all that calm about her possessions, but she is very lah-di-dah with men.
2. interj. a jeer; a mocking response. So you have a new car! Well, lah-di-dah.
References in periodicals archive ?
She said: "Sure honey, it's great to have the money and go to the premieres and all that lah-di-dah bull***t.
With busybody Norris permanently attached to a watering can, and having already clashed with Gail in pursuit of the first prize, his friend Scary Mary has some alarming news about the sudden horticultural efforts of lah-di-dah Sally Webster.
Then the only disturbances would be the Rovers' lah-di-dah landlady Annie Walker rattling her jewellery or battleaxe Ena Sharples plopping her dentures into a glass of water.
He laughs at his lah-di-dah accent which happened as a result of his time at public school.
But he will be a friend to all the lah-di-dah Newmarket trainers and his monied background, public-school breeding, and plummy voice are our passport to the world of privilege which dominates racing.
She spent years persuading lah-di-dah companies that her brand of holistics could unblock the energy channels of employees.
She is a stuck-up old bat with the lah-di-dah pretensions of that legendary grand dame of the Rovers Return, Annie Walker, mixed with a malicious streak that would make Anne Robinson shudder.
The hoity-toity Slater sister Belinda turns up for Zoe's party in the Vic and gets all lah-di-dah with her credit card.
44 The Speaker sacked his secretary for being a "typical Sloane Ranger with a lah-di-dah accent" whom he was convinced voted Tory.
We were mainly beaten by lah-di-dahs in white vests and plimsolls.
I don't like the lah-di-dahs who hunt them, but that's my class war problem.
Talk about gentlemen's game played by louts; more lah-di-dahs than louts if you ask me.
Even Denise Robertson on one occasion last November referred to "a few lah-di-dahs hopping about in red coats" ( her words.
If all this Parliamentary time is being given to stopping a few lah-di-dahs prancing about in red coats without benefiting the fox, surely MPs could make better use of the time?