labour

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labor under the illusion of/that

To live, operate, or function with the unyielding belief in something, especially that which is fanciful, unrealistic, or untrue. Primarily heard in US. Jeremy's always labored under the illusion of being a great writer, even though he's never written more than a few crummy poems. No one likes paying taxes, but those who would call for them to be done away with altogether are laboring under the illusion that our society can function without them!
See also: illusion, labor, of, that

labor under the delusion of/that

To live, operate, or function with the unyielding belief in something, especially that which is fanciful, unrealistic, or untrue. Primarily heard in US. Jeremy's always labored under the delusion of being a great writer, even though he's never written more than a few crummy poems. No one likes paying taxes, but those who would call for them to be done away with altogether are laboring under the delusion that our society can function without them!
See also: delusion, labor, of, that

stoop labour

Hard, physical labour requiring one to bend over, especially that which would be done on a farm. Primarily heard in UK. My grandfather has a permanent hunch in his spine from the stoop labour he had to do throughout his life. Every summer, we send the children to my brother's farm. It's good for them to get out of the city for a while and do a little bit of stoop labour.
See also: labour, stoop

labor of love

Work that is done for pleasure rather than money. Katherine spends all of her free time knitting baby clothes for her friends. It must be a labor of love.
See also: labor, love, of

labor the point

To talk about or emphasize something more than is necessary, usually to the listener's boredom or annoyance. A: "I don't mean to labor the point, but I'm just worried that there won't be enough food at the party." B: "Yeah, we know, you've said that 10 times now." I'm only laboring the point because we still haven't reached a decision.
See also: labor, point

labor of love

Fig. a task that is either unpaid or badly paid and that one does simply for one's own satisfaction or pleasure or to please someone whom one likes or loves. Jane made no money out of the biography she wrote. She was writing about the life of a friend and the book was a labor of love. Mary hates knitting, but she made a sweater for her boyfriend. What a labor of love.
See also: labor, love, of

labor of love

Work done for one's satisfaction rather than monetary reward. For example, The research took three years but it was a labor of love. This expression appears twice in the New Testament (Hebrews 6:10, Thessalonians 1:3), referring to those who do God's work as a labor of love. [c. 1600]
See also: labor, love, of

a labour of love

COMMON A labour of love is a task that you do because you enjoy it or feel strongly that it is worth doing. Note: `Labour' is spelled `labor' in American English. There is no doubt that his debut novel is a labour of love, and obviously very close to his heart. They concentrated on restoring buildings such as the Victorian greenhouse, an expensive labour of love. Note: This appears in the Bible in 1 Thessalonians 1:3, `Remembering without ceasing your work of faith, and labour of love, and patience of hope in our Lord Jesus Christ'.
See also: labour, love, of

labour the point

If someone labours the point, they keep explaining something or emphasizing a fact even though people have already understood it. I don't want to labour the point but there it is. The truth, without labouring the point, is that one can lead a good and fulfilling life without children.
See also: labour, point

a labour of Hercules

a task requiring enormous strength or effort.
In Greek mythology, Hercules was a man of superhuman strength and courage who performed twelve immense tasks or labours imposed on him as a penance for killing his children in a fit of madness. After his death he was ranked among the gods.
See also: Hercules, labour, of

a labour of love

a task done for the love of a person or for the work itself.
See also: labour, love, of

labour the point

explain or discuss something at excessive or unnecessary length.
See also: labour, point

a ˌlabour of ˈlove

a hard task that you do because you want to, not because it is necessary: This tablecloth is a real labour of love. It took her years to make it.
See also: labour, love, of

labour the ˈpoint

continue to repeat or explain something that is already clear: I think you’ve said enough — there’s no need to labour the point.
See also: labour, point
References in classic literature ?
You won, and the old American Federation of Labour crumbled to pieces.
How many strikes have you won by starving labour into submission?
I notice that you have profited in the past by those very labour gouges you mention," insinuated Brentwood, one of the wiliest and most astute of our corporation lawyers.
Labour caught us napping and struck at our weakest place, the stomach.
What worried him was the wire-cutting; he could not but believe that it was an important part of the deep-laid labour conspiracy.
Organized labour, we knew, had its private supplies; nevertheless, the whole working class joined the bread-lines.
No cataclysm of nature had caused this, but, rather, the tyranny of the labour unions.
The proletarian is without property; his relation to his wife and children has no longer anything in common with the bourgeois family-relations; modern industrial labour, modern subjection to capital, the same in England as in France, in America as in Germany, has stripped him of every trace of national character.
But I must observe, too, that at first this was a confused heap of goods, which, as they lay in no order, so they took up all my place; I had no room to turn myself: so I set myself to enlarge my cave, and work farther into the earth; for it was a loose sandy rock, which yielded easily to the labour I bestowed on it: and so when I found I was pretty safe as to beasts of prey, I worked sideways, to the right hand, into the rock; and then, turning to the right again, worked quite out, and made me a door to come out on the outside of my pale or fortification.
It is true, by this method I could make but one board out of a whole tree; but this I had no remedy for but patience, any more than I had for the prodigious deal of time and labour which it took me up to make a plank or board: but my time or labour was little worth, and so it was as well employed one way as another.
And now it was that I began to keep a journal of every day's employment; for, indeed, at first I was in too much hurry, and not only hurry as to labour, but in too much discomposure of mind; and my journal would have been full of many dull things; for example, I must have said thus: "30TH.