knob

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ginger knob

vulgar derogatory A person, typically a man, with naturally red hair. Primarily heard in UK, Ireland.
See also: ginger, knob

necker's knob

dated A rounded knob mounted to the steering wheel of an automobile so that it may be steered with one hand. So called because the driver (typically male) is able to place his arm around his girlfriend or wife. My grandfather gave me his old Cadillac, which still had the necker's knob on the wheel from when he first started courting my grandmother.
See also: knob

with (brass) knobs on

  (British & Australian humorous)
if you describe something as a particular thing with knobs on, you mean it has similar qualities to that thing but they are more extreme Disney World was like an ordinary amusement park with knobs on.
See also: knob, on

get one’s knob polished

tv. to copulate or otherwise have sex. (Refers to a male. Usually objectionable.) Man, if you want to get your knob polished, just let me know. I got girls! I got girls you wouldn’t believe!
See also: get, knob, polished

necking knob

A swivel on a car's steering wheel. The necking knob enables the driver to steer with his left hand while encircling his girlfriend's shoulder with his right arm. Even when the driver was alone, the knob was an easy way to turn the car in the days before power steering.
See also: knob
References in periodicals archive ?
Chipped and damaged shells are common in knobbed whelks and other busyconine whelks that use their shell in feeding (Magalhaes 1948, Carriker 1951, Kraeuter et al.
Knobbed whelks use the margin of their own shell to hammer the shell of bivalve prey and in turn often chip the body whorl resulting in a decrease in shell size (Magalhaes 1948, Carriker 1951).
infinity]] for female knobbed whelks collected in Georgia.
Statewide dockside samples revealed that knobbed whelks exceeded 130-mm SL in 1982-1983 catches, but the number of whelks per bushel and daily catches was decreasing (Anderson et al.
Female knobbed whelks occurred significantly more frequently than males in South Carolina commercial catches (Anderson 1985, Anderson et al.
A biological evaluation of the knobbed whelk fishery in South Carolina.