knight

(redirected from knights)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to knights: Knights of the Round Table, Knights Templar

knight in shining armor

A selfless, chivalrous man who helps a woman in distress. When the police officer pulled over to help the old woman change her flat tire, she hugged him and said he was her knight in shining armor.
See also: armor, knight, shine

white knight

1. One who saves another person from harm or a difficult situation. I don't remember much from the accident, but I am forever grateful to the white knight who freed me from my car. When Sally came to help with the kids when I was in the hospital, she really was our white night.
2. A person or company that purchases, or gives money to, another company that is in financial distress or about to be acquired by a third party. We all thought we were going to lose our jobs, but then a white knight purchased the company and saved it from bankruptcy.
See also: knight, white

all-nighter

1. The act of staying up all night to complete an activity, usually some kind of academic project. I'm going to have to pull an all-nighter if I'm going to get this term paper done in time for school tomorrow.
2. An establishment that remains open all night. Kyle and Amanda stopped at an all-nighter for a snack after the concert.
3. One who stays awake all night. Jess is a total all-nighter, so that third-shift job is perfect for her.

a knight in shining armor

someone who helps you when you are in a difficult situation She was looking for a knight in shining armor who might save her from her boring life.
Usage notes: usually said by a woman about a man
Etymology: in medieval times (500 to 1500 C.E.), knights were soldiers on horses who were also supposed to help and protect women
See also: armor, knight, shine

a knight in shining armour

  (British & Australian) also a knight in shining armor (American & Australian)
someone who helps you when you are in a difficult situation
Usage notes: In stories about medieval times (= the time between 500 and 1500 AD), knights were soldiers who rode on horses and helped women in difficult or dangerous situations.
She looked around the bar to see if there was a knight in shining armour who might come and save her from this awful man.
See also: armour, knight, shine

a white knight

someone who gives money to a company in order to prevent it from being bought by another company Hope is fading that a white knight will appear to stop the takeover bid.
See also: knight, white

knight in shining armor

A rescuer or defender, as in What this political party needs is a knight in shining armor to change its tarnished image . This metaphoric expression alludes to a medieval knight. [Mid-1900s]
See also: armor, knight, shine

all-nighter

1. n. something that lasts all night, like a party or study session. After an all-nighter studying, I couldn’t keep my eyes open for the test.
2. n. a place of business that is open all night. We stopped at an all-nighter for a cup of coffee.
3. n. a person who often stays up all night. I’m no all-nighter. I need my beauty sleep, for sure.

knight in shining armor

A wonderful guy. Fairy tales chronicled fair maidens in distress who were rescued at the last minute from dragons and ogres by a gallant knight in gleaming armor, where-upon they all lived happily ever after. Even if a young woman didn't view herself as a princess or consider herself in desperate straits, she still imagined herself being carried off by the man of her dreams, Prince Charming, a knight in shining armor.
See also: armor, knight, shine
References in classic literature ?
Scarce a mile had been covered ere the knight, turning to look for pursuers, saw the face of Norman of Torn not ten paces behind him.
With a look of mingled surprise, chagrin and incredulity the knight reined in his horse, exclaiming as he did so, "Mon Dieu, Edward
The charging steed was almost upon him and the knight looked to see the rider draw rein, but like a black bolt the mighty Sir Mortimer struck the other horse full upon the shoulder, and man and steed rolled in the dust of the roadway.
It is Sir William de Pakington, the prince's own herald and scrivener," whispered Sir Nigel, as they pulled up amid the line of knights who waited admission.
Many of the company had crowded round the flames, for the weather was bitterly cold; but the two knights seated themselves upon a bancal, with their squires standing behind them.
The two knights were deep in talk, when Alleyne became aware of a remarkable individual who was walking round the room in their direction.
For the rest of all the wonderful stories of King Arthur and his knights you must go to Morte d'Arthur itself.
With that Sir Arthur turned with his knights, and smote behind and before, and ever Sir Arthur was in the foremost press till his horse was slain under him.
Stories of King Arthur's Knights, by Mary Macgregor.
Well, we must fight for her, then,' said the Red Knight, as he took up his helmet (which hung from the saddle, and was something the shape of a horse's head), and put it on.
the White Knight remarked, putting on his helmet too.
They had scarcely watched the great road known as Watling Street which runs from Dover in Kent to Chester town--for many minutes, when they espied a knight riding by in a very forlorn and careless manner.
Little John came up to the knight and bade him stay; for who can judge of a man's wealth by his looks?
Truly, good Robin," said the Knight, a smile twitching at the corners of his mouth, "thou hast a quaint conceit.
Now, I make my vow, Sir Knight," quoth Robin, "thou hast surely learned thy wisdom of good Gaffer Swanthold, for he sayeth, `Fair words are as easy spoke as foul, and bring good will in the stead of blows.