king


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Related to king: King James Bible

drag king

A woman who wears the clothing and assumes the demeanor of a male, especially as part of an exaggerated performance piece. The mother of two performs with a drag king troupe on the weekends, much to the bemusement of some of her more conservative friends.
See also: drag, king

king of (the) beasts

The lion, especially in cultural or artistic depictions. Engraved in striking marble, the king of beasts stands sentinel over this ancient arena. The king of the beasts is the symbol for the zodiac sign Leo.
See also: beast, king, of

king of the jungle

The lion, especially in cultural or artistic depictions. (Usually a misnomer, as lions typically inhabit deserts or dry forests, as opposed to jungles.) Engraved in striking marble, the king of the jungle stands sentinel over this ancient arena. The king of the jungle is the symbol for the zodiac sign Leo.
See also: jungle, king, of

king of the hill

The most powerful, successful, or authoritative person in a group or organization. After years of slowly moving up the ranks, Joe finally became king of the hill in his office. This team will be hard to beat, reigning as king of the hill for three years straight.
See also: hill, king, of

a cat may look at a king

Everyone has rights, regardless of status, especially to do things that are of no consequence to others. You can't keep us out of the student council office just because we're underclassman! A cat may look at a king, after all!
See also: cat, king, look, may

king's ransom

A very large sum of money. I've always wanted to vacation in Hawaii, but the plane tickets cost a king's ransom.
See also: ransom

Cash is king.

Prov. It is best to keep one's investment money in cash. (Said when the prices in the securities markets are too high. It is better to build up cash and wait for a break in the market.) Things look a little pricey now. I'd say that cash is king for the moment. I'm holding a little cash for a little bottom fishing, but I wouldn't say that cash is king.
See also: cash, king

cat can look at a king

Prov. No one is so important that an ordinary person cannot look at him or her; everyone has the right to be curious about important people. Jane: I get so angry at those people who read tabloid magazines. The private lives of television stars are none of their business. Alan: Don't be so hard on them. A cat can look at a king. Fred: You shouldn't stare at me like that. I'm your boss. Jill: A cat can look at a king.
See also: can, cat, king, look

*cocky as the king of spades

boastful; overly proud. (*Also: as ~.) He'd challenge anyone to a fight. He's as cocky as the king of spades. She strutted in, cocky as the king of spades.
See also: cocky, king, of, spade

fit for a king

 and fit for the gods
Fig. very nice; luxurious. What a delicious meal. It was fit for a king. Our room at the hotel was fit for a king.
See also: fit, king

In the country of the blind, the one-eyed man is king.

Prov. A person who is not particularly capable can attain a powerful position if the people around him or her are even less capable. Jill: How on earth did Joe get promoted to be head of his department? He's such a blunderer! Jane: In the country of the blind, the one-eyed man is king.
See also: country, king, man, of

*king's ransom

Fig. a great deal of money. (To pay an amount as large as one might have to pay to get back a king held for ransom. *Typically: cost ~; pay ~; spend~.) I would like to buy a nice watch, but I don't want to pay a king's ransom for it. It's a lovely house. I bet it cost a king's ransom.
See also: ransom

Kings have long arms.

 and Governments have long arms.
Prov. Those who are in power can always catch and punish people who have opposed them, no matter how far away those opponents may go. After his attempt to assassinate the king, the prince sailed to a distant country, although his wife warned him it would be to no avail. "Kings have long arms," she reminded him.
See also: arm, have, King, long

sport of kings

horse racing. The sport of kings has sure impoverished a lot of commoners.
See also: king, of, sport

a king's ransom

a large amount of money A visit to one of those amusement parks can cost a king's ransom.
Usage notes: often used with worth or cost, as in the example
See also: ransom

a king's ransom

a very large amount of money (not used with the ) She was wearing a diamond necklace which must have been worth a king's ransom.
See also: ransom

king of the castle

  (British) also king of the hill (American)
the most successful or most powerful person in a group of people Jamie Spence was king of the castle yesterday when he beat the defending champion in the third round. Our team is sure to be king of the hill this year.
See turn king's's evidence, live like a king
See also: castle, king, of

live like a king

to live in a very comfortable way with all the luxuries you want He lived like a king for six months, drinking champagne and driving a Porsche, until the money finally ran out.
See also: king, like, live

turn king's/queen's evidence

  also turn state's evidence
if someone who has been accused of a crime turns king's evidence, they give information in a court of law about other people involved in the crime in order to have their own punishment reduced She was given a lenient sentence in exchange for turning king's evidence.
See also: evidence, turn

king's ransom

A huge sum of money, as in That handmade rug must have cost a king's ransom. This metaphoric expression originally referred to the sum required to release a king from captivity. [Late 1400s]
See also: ransom

live like a king

Also, live like a prince. Enjoy a lavish style of living, as in He spared no expense, preferring to live like a king as long as he could, or Since they got their inheritance, the Andersons are living like princes. This expression continues to be used despite the much smaller role royalty plays in the present day. [Mid-1500s]
See also: king, like, live

Cash is king

sent. It is best to keep one’s investment money in cash. (Said when the prices in the securities market are too high. It is better to build up cash and wait for a break in the market.) Things look a little pricey now. I’d say that cash is king for the moment.
See also: cash, king

King Grod

(...grɑd)
n. a very repellent male. (California.) You are just King Grod! So gross!
See also: Grod, king

King Kong pills

and King Kong specials
n. barbiturates. (see also gorilla biscuits.) Watch out for those King Kong pills. She’s a bit numb from “King Kong specials.”
See also: king, Kong, pill

King Kong specials

verb
See also: king, Kong, special
References in classic literature ?
A day may come when this child who has not seen the light rules as king in Zululand, and then in reward you shall be the greatest of the people, the king's voice, whisperer in the king's ear.
The Queen was away at a dance that night at her cousin's; but the King was in bed fast asleep.
If that's all you know about it, you may stand down,' continued the King.
Now the king had a grand-vizir who was avaricious, and envious, and a very bad man.
The King mourned, but he did not think that the Queen had done the wicked deed, and as he was afraid the maiden would also be taken from him, he wanted to take her with him.
In this speech the Sheriff erred, for the King asked quickly,
so you may plainly see, Treville," interrupted the king, "it was they who attacked?
The king overheard these words and turned around with tears in his eyes.
It was with the eyes of the king as with the immense depths of the azure heavens, or with those more terrific, and almost as sublime, which the Mediterranean reveals under the keels of its ships in a clear summer day, a gigantic mirror in which heaven delights to reflect sometimes its stars, sometimes its storms.
And next morning when the king had his twelve huntsmen summoned, they went through the ante-chamber, and never once looked at the spinning-wheels.
muttered the king, between his teeth, as the chief magistrate was in the middle of a long address.
Then, above all the tumult and the shouting a great voice was heard roaring, "Heaven, its saints bless thee, our gracious King Richard
Therefore the King stormed and raved all by himself, walking up and down in his jewel-studded cavern and getting angrier all the time.
A power in England, second only to the King himself, and with the heart of a lion in him, he answered the King as no other man in all England would have dared answer him.
The King of England, now Henry VI, was only a child.