kind

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Related to kindest: on the contrary, so to say

a kind word for everybody

A friendly, amiable, and positive regard for one and all. I believe that if I can have a kind word for everybody, I will end up making other people's lives that much better.
See also: everybody, kind, word

(with) kind regards

A common, semi-formal valediction (used to say farewell at the end of a letter or other written message; also known as a complimentary close) expressing well wishes to the recipient. Please send a financial report for your company for the previous year at your earliest convenience. With kind regards, Alex Goodman. I hope I'll have the chance of meeting with you again soon. Kind regards, Brian
See also: kind, regard

of a kind

Having inferior, mediocre, or incomplete characteristics of something. He writes poetry of a kind, but it's nothing that will set the world ablaze. The office has a gym of a kind, but it's in such disrepair that no one really uses it.
See also: kind, of

anything of the kind

Anything that is similar, close to, or like what was said or is in question. (Usually used in a negative formation.) I don't know why you think I agreed to pay you a hundred dollars—I didn't say anything of the kind. I believe you about what you saw, but I honestly don't recall anything of the kind ever occurring here!
See also: anything, kind, of

kindest regards

A common, semi-formal valediction (used to say farewell at the end of a letter or other written message; also known as a complimentary close) expressing well wishes to the recipient. I hope I'll have the chance of meeting with you again soon. Kindest regards, Brian
See also: kind, regard

of the same kind

Very much alike. I knew we would be best friends as soon as we met—we're two of the same kind, you and me.
See also: kind, of, same

pay (one) back in kind

To avenge past misdeeds with similar actions. Greg got me in trouble with the boss, and I will pay him back in kind. You need to pay her back in kind for all the bad things she's done to you!
See also: back, kind, pay

kind of

Somewhat; sort of; a little. I'm happy that it's summertime, but I'm still kind of disappointed that school is over. A: "Are you feeling better?" B: "Kind of. My throat isn't sore anymore but I'm still congested."
See also: kind, of

a kind of (something)

A replacement or alternative to (the real thing). I had to use the block of wood as a kind of hammer to get the loose nail back into place.
See also: kind, of

*all kinds of someone or something

Fig. a great number of people or things; a great amount of something, especially money. (*Typically: be ~; have ~.) There were all kinds of people there, probably thousands. The Smith family has all kinds of money.
See also: all, kind, of

crawling with some kind of creature

[of a surface] covered with insects or animals, moving about. The basement was crawling with rats! We came home and found the kitchen floor crawling with ants.
See also: crawl, creature, kind, of

get some kind of mileage out of something

 
1. Lit. to achieve some level of efficiency with a vehicle. (Some kind of typically includes more, better, good, etc.) Do you get good mileage out of a vehicle like this.
2. Fig. to get [sufficient] use or service from something. I wish I could get better mileage out of this car. He knows how to get a lot of mileage out of a pair of shoes.
See also: get, kind, mileage, of, out

in kind

 
1. in goods rather than in money. The country doctor was usually paid in kind. He accepted two pigs as payment for an operation. Do you have to pay tax on payments made in kind?
2. similarly; [giving] something similar to what was received. John punched Bill, and Bill gave it back in kind. She spoke rudely to me, so I spoke to her in kind.
See also: kind

It takes all kinds (to make a world).

Fig. There are many different kinds of people, and you should not condemn them for being different. Jill: Eleanor's trying another fad diet. This week she's sprinkling dried algae on all her food. Jane: It takes all kinds. Child: Mommy, I saw a weird man today. He was walking down the street singing real loud. I wish they'd put weird people like that away. Mother: Now, now, honey, it takes all kinds to make a world.
See also: all, kind, take

a kind of something

a variety of something that is fairly close to the real thing, even though it is not exactly the real thing. I used a folded newspaper as a kind of hat to keep the rain off. Bill is serving as a kind of helper or assistant on this project.
See also: kind, of

let out some kind of sound

[for a living creature] to make some kind of a noise or sound. Be quiet. Don't let out a sound! Suddenly, Jane let out a shriek.
See also: kind, let, of, out, sound

nothing of the kind

 
1. no; absolutely not. I didn't tear your jacket—nothing of the kind! Did I break your vase? Nothing of the kind!
2. nothing like that. That's not true. We did nothing of the kind! She did nothing of the kind! She wasn't even there!
See also: kind, nothing, of

sort of

 and kind of
Yes, but only to a small degree. Bob: Do you like what you're doing in school? Alice: Kind of. Henry: What do you think about all these new laws? Do they worry you? John: Sort of.
See also: of, sort

sort of something

 and kind of something
almost something; somewhat; somehow. Isn't it sort of cold out? That was kind of a stupid thing to do, wasn't it?
See also: of, sort

two of a kind

Fig. people or things of the same type or that are similar in character, attitude, etc. Jack and Tom are two of a kind. They're both ambitious. The companies are two of a kind. They both pay their employees badly.
See also: kind, of, two

with advance notice

 and on advance notice
with some kind of notification or indication that something is going to happen or is expected before it actually happens. We are happy to provide special meals for anyone with advance notice.
See also: advance, notice

in kind

with the same thing It was a nasty letter, but I will not respond in kind.
Etymology: based on payment in kind (paying for something with food or things or work rather than money)
See also: kind

kind of

to some degree sort of I try to dress kind of nicely for work. I guess I kind of forget to thank her for all she does for me.
See also: kind, of

one of a kind

the only item of a particular type He was an extraordinary person - absolutely one of a kind.
See also: kind, of, one

two of a kind

very similar (like) two peas in a pod Where books are concerned, Tyler and Chloë are two of a kind.
See also: kind, of, two

sort of

to some degree kind of It seemed to be sort of a cross between an oyster and a mushroom.
Usage notes: sometimes used to show that you are not certain about something: I'm sort of at an age where I just want things to be a little more orderly.
See also: of, sort

You have to be cruel to be kind.

something that you say when you do something to someone that will upset them now because you think it will help them in the future I told her she's just not good enough to be a professional dancer - sometimes you have to be cruel to be kind. I know you have to be cruel to be kind, Sam, but telling Amy that she looks fat in her party dress was a bit harsh.
See also: cruel, have, kind

not be the marrying kind

  (humorous)
if a man is not the marrying kind, he does not want to be married
Usage notes: People sometimes use this phrase to mean that the man is homosexual (= sexually attracted to other men).
George has had several girlfriends, but he's not the marrying kind.
See also: kind, marry

be one of a kind

to be the only one of a particular type of thing or person As a female engineer who began her career in the 1940s, she was one of a kind.
See also: kind, of, one

be two of a kind

if two people are two of a kind, they have very similar characters Amy and I are two of a kind. That's why we've stayed friends for so long.
See also: kind, of, two

all kinds of

1. Also, all manner or sorts of . All or many varieties of something, as in Before the banquet, they served all kinds of drinks, or He sold exotic fruit of all sorts, or The museum featured all manner of artifacts. [Early 1300s]
2. A large amount of something, as in She has all kinds of money. This hyperbolic usage is colloquial.
See also: all, kind, of

in kind

1. With produce or commodities rather than money. For example, I edited Bob's book for payment in kind; he gave me voice lessons in exchange. [c. 1600]
2. In the same manner or with an equivalent, as in He returned the insult in kind. [Early 1700s]
See also: kind

kind of

Also, sort of. Rather, somewhat, as in I'm kind of hungry, or The bird looked sort of like a sparrow. [Colloquial; c. 1800] This usage should not be confused with a kind of or a sort of, which are much older and refer to a borderline member of a given category (as in a kind of a shelter or a sort of a bluish color). Shakespeare had this usage in Two Gentlemen of Verona (3:1): "My master is a kind of a knave." Also see of a kind.
See also: kind, of

nothing of the kind

Also, nothing of the sort.
1. No, certainly not, as in Did you push Charlie?-Nothing of the kind! or Do you think the kids were trying to shoplift?-Nothing of the sort. [Second half of 1800s]
2. Not at all like what is mentioned or expected, as in They thought we would look them up, but we'd intended nothing of the kind. [Second half of 1800s]
See also: kind, nothing, of

of a kind

1. Of some sort, but not a typical or perfect specimen. For example, They have a backyard of a kind, but it's tiny. This usage was first recorded in 1895. For a synonym, see of sorts.
2. one of a kind. A unique instance, as in There are no others like it; this hybrid daylily is one of a kind, or She's extremely generous, one of a kind. Also see two of a kind.
See also: kind, of

one of a kind

see under of a kind.
See also: kind, of, one

two of a kind

Very similar individuals or things, as in Patrice and John are two of a kind-they're true hiking enthusiasts. This idiom uses kind in the sense of "a class with common characteristics," a usage dating from about a.d. 1000.
See also: kind, of, two

all kinds of

Informal
Plenty of; ample: We have all kinds of time to finish the job.
See also: all, kind, of

in kind

1. With produce or commodities rather than with money: pay in kind.
2. In the same manner or with an equivalent: returned the slight in kind.
See also: kind

kind of

Informal
Rather; somewhat: I'm kind of hungry.
See also: kind, of

of a kind

Of the same kind; alike: My father and my uncle are two of a kind.
See also: kind, of

sort of

Informal
Somewhat; rather: "Gambling and prostitution ... have been prohibited, but only sort of" (George F. Will).
See also: of, sort
References in periodicals archive ?
I work at Hollyfast Primary School and would like to say that the children there are the most well mannered, kindest and nicest people ever, so are the young people at Coundon Court.
Those are easily the kindest words spoken about Choi by a Dodgers pitcher this year.
Axing Danniella Westbrook could be the kindest thing that bosses at EastEnders could have done for the troubled star.
About Cadmus himself, however, all agree: This enormously talented artist was also the kindest, gentlest, most self-deprecating of men.
Dylan received a medal for his achievements from David Cameron after being shortlisted on the Britain's Kindest Kid competition, run by Five News and the Charities Aid Foundation.
05 Newmarket 1m2f handicap RUK/C4 Card page 30 Key stat Chris Wall has a 20 per cent strike-rate at the track in the last five seasons and is represented by Kindest What they say James Eustace, trainer of Geneva Geyser "He's in good form and has been freshened up from his last run.
All these people were the kindest ones you could meet.
Lanny is as smitten with Einstein as Sinclair had been, describing him as ``the kindest, gentlest, sweetest of men,'' and as an ``elderly Jewish cherub .
It was thought the kindest way to deal with the situation,' explained a Coastguard spokesman.
Fortunately, in the kindest possible way, the aforementioned ladies gave me a shaking by showing me that their valiant efforts were most worthy of support.
St Mark 15, 39 NOT just the sweetest, kindest soul who ever lived, not just the wisest teacher who ever taught - but the Son of God.
The Labour leader said at Salford Cathedral: "Paul was a family man of faith and one of the kindest, most decent people I had the privilege of meeting.
I really think the kindest thing to do would be put him out of his misery and pension him off.
She is one of the kindest persons you would wish to meet.
We regret that our daughter couldn't continue to share her life with such a kind group of people, the kindest in the world.