killed


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kill the clock

In sports, to protect a lead by using up as much possible time that remains in a game or match without giving the opposing team a chance to score, generally by maintaining a passive or defensive strategy. With just a narrow two-point lead, the home team is trying to kill the clock to hold out for a win. I don't know, Jim, there's a lot of game time left for them to start killing the clock.
See also: clock, kill

kill (one)self

1. To commit suicide. Once John realized he had begun to have thoughts of killing himself, he decided to seek help.
2. To bring about one's death by performing a particular action. This phrase can be said when one's life is or could be in danger, but it is often used figuratively. I can hardly breathe—I'm going to kill myself if I go back on the treadmill right now! If they try driving home in this snow, they'll kill themselves—tell them to get a hotel room for the night.
3. To overexert oneself. Don't kill yourself trying to get the report done tonight—it's not due until next week anyway.
See also: kill

kill two birds with one stone

To complete, achieve, or take care of two tasks at the same time or with a singular series of actions; to solve two problems with one action or solution. I might as well kill two birds with one stone and drop off my tax forms while I'm at the mall for the computer part I need. Bike-to-work schemes are a great way of killing two birds with one stone: getting more exercise while cutting down on the cost of your daily commute.
See also: bird, kill, one, stone, two

curiosity killed the cat

Inquisitiveness can be dangerous, especially when it extends to things one does not need to know about. I think you'll offend her by asking such personal questions—curiosity killed the cat, after all. I know curiosity killed the cat, but I can't stop the investigation until I know where the donations are really going.
See also: cat, curiosity, killed

kill the goose that lays the golden egg(s)

To ruin or destroy something that brings one wealth. Firing the programmer who created your most successful app is like killing the goose that lays the golden egg.
See also: golden, goose, kill, lay, that

kill the fatted calf

To prepare a lavish celebration, often to welcome someone back from a long absence. The phrase comes from the Biblical parable of the prodigal son, in which a father prepares a feast for his son who has returned home after squandering his fortune. My daughter is coming home from college for the summer, so we're going to kill the fatted calf and have a huge barbecue.
See also: calf, fat, kill

kill time

To engage in an activity, usually a rather aimless or idle one, with the goal of making time seem to pass more quickly or less slowly. I'm going to walk down to the bookstore to kill time before my flight. Do you want anything? It used to be that people killed time at the train station by talking to each other, but now everyone is nose-deep in their phone.
See also: kill, time

kill (one) with kindness

To harm, inconvenience, or bother one by treating them with excessive favor or kindness. The phrase originated as the expression "kill with kindness as fond apes do their young," referring to the notion that such animals sometimes crushed their offspring by hugging them too hard. I love talking to Grandma, but she calls me twice a day to see how I'm doing—right now she's killing me with kindness.
See also: kill, kindness

kill (something) stone dead

To totally halt or end something; to destroy or ruin something utterly. The nasty feedback she got about the piece killed her ambition to be a painter stone dead. Many thought the rise of digital media formats would kill physical media stone dead, but people have proven that their desire to collect and own something outright often outweighs their desire for convenience.
See also: dead, kill, stone

kill (oneself) (doing something)

To overexert oneself or overextend one's effort while doing something. Don't kill yourself trying to get the report done tonight—it's not due until next week anyway. They're killing themselves finishing the last touches on the exterior of the house before the storm hits us.
See also: kill

kill (oneself) laughing

To laugh hysterically and uncontrollably. The comedian had the whole audience killing themselves laughing. My ribs actually hurt from it! I was surprised by how funny my date was last night. I was killing myself laughing at some of her stories!
See also: kill, laugh

kill (someone) with extreme prejudice

To kill someone without hesitation, mercy, or discernment. The general warned the rebels that they must either surrender or be killed with extreme prejudice. We must kill these terrorists with extreme prejudice to ensure the safety of our country.
See also: extreme, kill, prejudice

Curiosity killed the cat.

Prov. Being curious can get you into trouble. (Often used to warn someone against prying into other's affairs.) Jill: Where did you get all that money? Jane: Curiosity killed the cat.
See also: cat, curiosity, killed

kill the fatted calf

Fig. to prepare an elaborate banquet (in someone's honor). (From the biblical story recounting the return of the prodigal son.) When Bob got back from college, his parents killed the fatted calf and threw a great party. Sorry this meal isn't much, John. We didn't have time to kill the fatted calf.
See also: calf, fat, kill

kill time

Fig. to use something up, especially time. I killed time reading a novel. The employees were not encouraged to kill time.
See also: kill, time

kill two birds with one stone

Fig. to solve two problems at one time with a single action. John learned the words to his part in the play while peeling potatoes. He was killing two birds with one stone. I have to cash a check and make a payment on my bank loan. I'll kill two birds with one stone by doing them both in one trip to the bank.
See also: bird, kill, one, stone, two

killed outright

killed immediately. The driver was killed outright in the accident. Twenty people were killed outright in the explosion.
See also: killed

little (hard) work never hurt anyone

 and little (hard) work never killed anyone
Prov. One should expect to do hard or difficult work and not avoid doing it. Go help your father with the yard work. A little hard work never hurt anyone. Go ahead. Bring me some more bricks. A little work never killed anyone.
See also: anyone, hurt, little, never, work

curiosity killed the cat

It's best to mind one's own business. For example, Don't ask about his divorce-curiosity killed the cat. This cautionary expression sounds like the moral of some fable or folktale, but any such origin for it has been lost. The first recorded use was in O. Henry's Schools and Schools (1909).
See also: cat, curiosity, killed

kill the fatted calf

Prepare for a joyful occasion or a warm welcome. For example, When Bill comes home from his trip to Korea we're going to kill the fatted calf. This expression alludes to the parable of the prodigal son (Luke 15:11-32), whose father welcomed him by serving the choicest calf after his return. [Early 1600s]
See also: calf, fat, kill

kill time

Pass time aimlessly. For example, There was nothing to do, so I sat around killing time until dinner was ready. This idiom was first recorded about 1768.
See also: kill, time

kill two birds with one stone

Achieve two ends with a single effort, as in As long as I was in town on business, I thought I'd kill two birds and visit my uncle too . This expression is so well known that it is often shortened, as in the example. [c. 1600]
See also: bird, kill, one, stone, two

kill two birds with one stone

If you kill two birds with one stone, you manage to achieve two things at the same time. We can talk about Union Hill while I get this business over with. Kill two birds with one stone, so to speak. He had been on his way to the vegetable man's van, both to purchase some cucumbers for his mother and — to kill two birds with one stone — to seek out Mr Halloran.
See also: bird, kill, one, stone, two

kill the fatted calf

If you kill the fatted calf, you do everything you can to welcome back a person who has been away for a period of time. He went away for year, and when he returned, his family didn't exactly kill the fatted calf. Note: This expression comes from the story of the prodigal son which is told by Jesus in the Bible (Luke 5:3-32). In this story, a young man returns home after wasting all the money his father has given him. However, his father is so pleased to see him that he celebrates his return by killing a calf and preparing a feast.
See also: calf, fat, kill

curiosity killed the cat

You say curiosity killed the cat to warn someone that they might suffer harm themselves if they try to find out about matters that do not involve them. `Where are we going?' Calder asked. `Curiosity killed the cat, dear. You'll find out soon enough.'
See also: cat, curiosity, killed

curiosity killed the cat

being inquisitive about other people's affairs may get you into trouble. proverb
See also: cat, curiosity, killed

kill the fatted calf

produce a lavish celebratory feast.
The allusion is to the New Testament story of the prodigal son (Luke 15:11–32), in which the forgiving father orders his best calf to be killed in order to provide a feast to celebrate the return of his wayward son. Fatted is an archaic form of the verb fat meaning ‘make or become fat’. Nowadays we use the forms fatten and fattened .
See also: calf, fat, kill

kill time

do things to make time seem to pass more quickly and to avoid getting bored, especially while waiting for something.
See also: kill, time

kill two birds with one stone

achieve two aims at once.
See also: bird, kill, one, stone, two

curiosity killed the ˈcat

(saying) used to tell somebody not to ask so many questions, especially in reply to a question that you do not want to answer: ‘Are you two thinking of getting married by any chance?’ ‘Now, now. Curiosity killed the cat!’
See also: cat, curiosity, killed

ˌkill the fatted ˈcalf

welcome home somebody who has been away for a long time by having a big celebration: My brother’s coming home tomorrow, so I expect my parents will be killing the fatted calf for him.This is from a story in the Bible, in which a father arranges a special meal when his son returns to the family after a long time away. A fatted calf is a young cow that has been given extra food to make it fat.
See also: calf, fat, kill

kill two birds with one ˈstone

manage to achieve two aims by doing one thing: If we have to go to Manchester for the meeting, then let’s visit Auntie Joan on the way there. We can kill two birds with one stone.
See also: bird, kill, one, stone, two

killed (off)

mod. alcohol or drug intoxicated. (Drugs.) The team went out drinking and came home killed off.
See also: killed, off

killed

verb

kill the fatted calf

To hold a celebration, usually a long-awaited homecoming. Luke 15:23 describes the return of the prodigal son as, “And bring here the fatted calf, and kill it; and let us eat, and be merry . . .” Although the guest of honor in the biblical parable was a wastrel whose father welcomed home, “to kill the fatted calf” can refer to a party for anyone whom the host is pleased to see.
See also: calf, fat, kill
References in classic literature ?
This smoke came nearer and nearer, and then, all at once, it vanished, and they saw the genius, who, without speaking to them, approached the merchant, sword in hand, and, taking him by the arm, said, "Get up and let me kill you as you killed my son.
he cried, "the man is guiltless, do him no hurt; and we will spare Medon too, who was always good to me when I was a boy, unless Philoetius or Eumaeus has already killed him, or he has fallen in your way when you were raging about the court.
The pair went into the outer court as fast as they could, and sat down by Jove's great altar, looking fearfully round, and still expecting that they would be killed.
And even as I returned to my jungle, so thou must go back to men at last--to the men who are thy brothers--if thou art not killed in the Council.
They would have killed him last night, but they needed thee also.
This cattle-killer said he would kill me in the Council because he had not killed me when I was a cub.
On the fourth day of July following, a party of about two hundred Indians attacked Boonsborough, killed one man, and wounded two.
During this dreadful siege they did a great deal of mischief, distressed the garrison, in which were only fifteen men, killed two, and wounded one.
We had no loss on our side: The enemy had one killed, and two wounded.
He killed Astynous, and Hypeiron shepherd of his people, the one with a thrust of his spear, which struck him above the nipple, the other with a sword-cut on the collar-bone, that severed his shoulder from his neck and back.
He has killed many a brave man--unless indeed he is some god who is angry with the Trojans about their sacrifices, and and has set his hand against them in his displeasure.
And he made Tiger-Face head man over all the guards, so that Tiger-Face became his right arm, and when he did not like a man Tiger-Face killed that man for him.
And we forgot that we were hungry, and why we had grumbled, and were glad to be led by Tiger-Face over the divide, where we killed many Meat-Eaters and were content.
I immediately cut the twisted flags or rushes which they had bound him with, and would have helped him up; but he could not stand or speak, but groaned most piteously, believing, it seems, still, that he was only unbound in order to be killed.
His first opinion was, that the savages in the boat never could live out the storm which blew that night they went off, but must of necessity be drowned, or driven south to those other shores, where they were as sure to be devoured as they were to be drowned if they were cast away; but, as to what they would do if they came safe on shore, he said he knew not; but it was his opinion that they were so dreadfully frightened with the manner of their being attacked, the noise, and the fire, that he believed they would tell the people they were all killed by thunder and lightning, not by the hand of man; and that the two which appeared - viz.