kick (oneself)

(redirected from kick themselves)

kick

1. noun, slang A sense of enjoyment, amusement, or excitement. Even as an adult, I still get a kick out of building sandcastles at the beach. She really gets a kick out of doing wheelies on her motorcycle in front of an audience.
2. noun, slang The strong sensation experienced from consuming something with a potent effect or flavor, such as a drug, a drink of alcohol, or a spicy food. Wow, that hot sauce has a real kick to it. My ears are burning!
3. noun, slang A shoe. Always used in the plural. Yo, check out those kicks. Are they original Jordans?
4. verb, slang To overcome an addiction. It took gum, patches, and counseling, but I've finally kicked smoking.

kick (oneself)

To reprove or rebuke oneself; to be angry with or disappointed in oneself. Usually used in continuous tenses. I knew I'd be kicking myself later if I came back and the bag was gone, so I went ahead and bought it. Plenty of companies are kicking themselves for not investing in the technology at an earlier stage.
See also: kick

kick oneself (for doing something)

Fig. to regret doing something. I could just kick myself for going off and not locking the car door. Now the car has been stolen. Don't kick yourself. It's insured.
See also: kick

kick oneself

Berate oneself, reproach one-self, as in I've been kicking myself all day for forgetting the keys. [Late 1800s]
See also: kick

kick yourself

If you kick yourself for doing something, you are annoyed with yourself for doing it. I was still kicking myself for not paying attention. I immediately regretted having said this — I could have kicked myself.
See also: kick

kick yourself

be annoyed with yourself for doing something foolish or missing an opportunity.
See also: kick

ˈkick yourself

(informal) be angry with yourself for something you have done or not done: Buy it. It’s a real bargain. You’ll kick yourself if you don’t.I told John that Susan was really lazy. Then somebody told me that she was a good friend of his. I could have kicked myself for being so stupid.
See also: kick

kick

verb

kick

1. n. a charge or good feeling (from something); pleasure or enjoyment from something. (see also get a kick out of someone/something.) That song really gives me a kick. I love it!
2. n. the jolt from a drug or a drink of strong liquor. The kick nearly knocked Harry over.
3. tv. to break a drug addiction voluntarily. (Drugs.) I knew I had the guts in me somewhere to kick juice.
4. n. a complaint. You got another kick, troublemaker?
5. in. to complain. Why are you always kicking?
6. Go to kicks.
References in periodicals archive ?
Monaghan will kick themselves for not holding on and securing back-to-back finals for the first time in 70 years.
A TEAM of taekwondo experts are hoping to kick themselves into the record books with a world record attempt in Coventry.
Teaching that the fear of failure and the idea that change is impossible are both things that are entirely mental, "21 Days to Creating Your Dream Life" is just what some people need to kick themselves into gear.
Hollywood equalised from a corner kick themselves when their midfielder turned on the edge of the box and fired home off the underside of the bar.
People kick themselves out because of the way they behave.
Barca can still win Group F if Milan lose at Celtic, and they would kick themselves if they missed out on a seeding because of failing to win tonight.
COLWYN BAY have good reason to kick themselves for surrendering all three points in this pulsating Unibond League Premier Division battle.
Land rakes choreographed clumsiness past the breaking point, punishing himself by dwelling on the pitfalls--awkwardness, ineptitude, alienation, stupor--and focusing on characters (the nightclub entertainer who repeatedly topples from his barstool) who can't help but kick themselves when they're down.
HUNDREDS of martial arts experts are planning to kick themselves into the record books at the world's biggest taekwondo open air display in Coventry city centre.
The Angels will kick themselves for years over the top of the ninth inning, when they loaded the bases off Boston closer Keith Foulke, only to see Foulke strike out Garret Anderson and Troy Glaus on a pair of wicked changeups.
During the course of this 90 minute masterpiece they inflict paper cuts on one another, eat their own waste, kick themselves in the forehead and snort Japanese mustard.
But Swansea will kick themselves as Steve Watkin muffed a second-half spot-kick and chances went begging.
If you take a chance and he's a bust, fine, but if you don't and he has a great career, teams will kick themselves,'' an NFL assistant coach said.