kick in


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Related to kick in: kick upstairs, kick off, kick out, kicking back

kick in (on something) (for someone or something)

Fig. to contribute to something for someone or something. Would you like to kick in on a gift for Joel? I'll be happy to kick in on a gift. Sure, I would like to kick in for the gift—
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kick something in (on something) (for someone or something)

to contribute something, such as money, on something for someone or something. I will kick a few bucks in on some flowers for the receptionist. I will kick in a few bucks on the gift for Marge.
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kick in

1. to start operating or happening We still don't know why the emergency generator failed to kick in when the power failed.
2. to provide money The mayor persuaded local firms to kick in the money to start the scholarship fund.
See also: kick

kick in

1. Contribute one's share, as in We'll kick in half if you take care of the rest. [Colloquial; c. 1900]
2. Also, kick off. Die, as in No one knows when he'll kick in, or He finally kicked off yesterday. [Slang; first half of 1900s] Also see kick the bucket.
3. Begin to operate, as in Finally the motor kicked in and we could get started. This usage was first recorded in 1908.
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kick in

v.
1. To break or smash a hole in something with a kick: The police kicked in the door. The burglar kicked the windows in to enter the house.
2. To contribute something, especially money: The boss kicked in $20 for the office party. I kicked a few bucks in to buy them a gift.
3. To become operative or take effect: I got dizzy when the medication kicked in.
See also: kick