kick around


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Related to kick around: kick up a fuss

kick around

1. Literally, to kick an object to move it around repeatedly, usually as a form of amusement. The activity can be done with oneself, in which the object is typically kicked with no particular goal, or with one or more partners, in which the object, usually a ball, is kicked back and forth. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is sometimes used between "kick" and "around." You want to go outside a kick a soccer ball around? He's been out there kicking around that old bottle for a half hour. You want to go ask him what's wrong?
2. To repeatedly treat one poorly, usually in a way that demeans or takes advantage of them. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is sometimes used between "kick" and "around." Oh no, I'm not getting kicked around anymore. I quit. I'm tired of you kicking your sister around all the time! Be nice to her!
3. To informally discuss something, typically a plan or idea. We've been kicking around the possibility of moving to Portland, but it's still just an idea. I want to call a meeting where we can all kick around ideas without any limitations, and see what we can come up with.
4. To travel or move around an area casually or with frequent relocations. I was an Army brat, so my family kicked around Europe throughout my childhood. The band has been kicking around in the Southwest for months, but the tour will take them to the coast soon.
5. To remain active or simply stay alive in old age. If I'm still kicking around when they invent a hoverboard, I'm going to try it, even if it's last thing I do. I can't believe Old Man Murphy is still kicking around—he was old when I was a kid!
See also: around, kick

kick someone or something around

 
1. Lit. to strike someone, something, or some animal with the foot repeatedly. Billy is out in the alley kicking a can around. Stop kicking that dog around!
2. Fig. to treat someone or something badly. I finally quit my job. My boss wouldn't stop kicking me around. Stop kicking my car around. It does everything I need a car to do.
See also: around, kick

kick something around

 
1. Lit. to move something around by kicking it, as in play. Kick the ball around awhile and then try to make a goal. The boys kicked a can around, making a lot of noise. Don't kick around all the dirt. You'll make a mess.
2. . Fig. to discuss something; to chat about an idea. We got together and kicked her idea around. Fred and Bob kicked around some plots for a new movie.
See also: around, kick

kick around

1. Treat badly, abuse, as in I'm sick and tired of being kicked around by my supervisor. [Colloquial; first half of 1900s]
2. Also, kick about. Move from place to place, as in They spent three years kicking around the country on their bikes, or We've no address; we're just kicking about until we find somewhere to settle. [Colloquial; early 1800s]
3. Also, kick about. Consider, think about or discuss; examine or try out. For example, Let's kick this scenario around for a while and see what we come up with, or We've been kicking about various schemes to make money. [Colloquial; first half of 1900s]
4. Be available or unused, as in This old computer has been kicking around for months-no one seems to want it. [c. 1900]
See also: around, kick

kick around

v.
1. To kick something back and forth casually: The players warmed up by kicking the ball around. The children kicked around a soccer ball on the playground.
2. To move from place to place casually or occasionally, usually within some region or place: Those old books have been kicking around the house for years.
3. To give thought or consideration to something; ponder or discuss something: We've been kicking around the names that you gave us, but none seems appropriate for the position. Chris and I have kicked the idea around, and we both agree that we should buy a new car.
4. To hassle or bully someone: Don't let your colleagues kick you around—stand up for yourself! The seniors are always kicking around the younger kids.
5. Slang To continue to be alive or active: My grandfather is still kicking around at the age of 80.
See also: around, kick

kick around

verb
See also: around, kick
References in periodicals archive ?
The motley crew of actors, singers and all-round Z-listers didn't bother with a kit and had a kick around in just their undies.
We first encounter the latter, weary with migraine and clad in fringed leather, disembarking a train in a windblown provincial village (although the setting is contemporary, hints of old Westerns kick around throughout the proceedings).
They got the early goal they craved when Sean Dyche was adjudged to have handballed and Paul Evans brilliantly bent the ninth-minute free kick around the wall to lodge his effort in the opposite corner.
The call-in shows will have to find someone else to kick around now.
Becks, 27, said his three-year-old loves football and always asks him to go out for a kick around.
Los Angeles was still an infant, barely out of its pueblo stage in November 1869 when a few young businessmen and civic leaders got together in an old saloon one night to kick around ideas for starting a volunteer fire department.
It seems to be a gift among bureaucrats that they can kick around a situation until they turn a crisis into a calamity.
If it doesn't, it might not have the Valley to kick around any more.