key to

key to

v.
To make something correspond to something else: I wrote up a teaching guide and keyed it to the materials for each lesson. The worksheets were keyed to the requirements for each course.
See also: key
References in classic literature ?
On the table before him they set food and water and upon the opposite end of the table they laid the key to the fetter.
The key that lay there on the table before him was the key to that very lock.
While it was thus engaged Ghek took his spider-like way along the table to the opposite end where lay the key to the fetter.
How should I, a prisoner, know better than my jailer the whereabouts of the key to my fetters?
It cost Boxtel two days more to bring his key to perfection, with the aid of a small file.
He had managed to coax old Brus, the gardener, into letting him have the key to the little postern gate on the plea that he wished to indulge in a midnight escapade, hinting broadly of a fair lady who was to be the partner of his adventure, and, what was more to the point with Brus, at the same time slipping a couple of golden zecchins into the gardener's palm.
Whatever else of mischief De Vac might be up to, Brus was quite sure that in so far as the King was concerned, the key to the postern gate was as safe in De Vac's hands as though Henry himself had it.
That night De Vac took the key to a locksmith on the far side of London; one who could not possibly know him or recognize the key as belonging to the palace.
The next day he returned the original key to Brus, telling the old man that he had not used it after all, since mature reflection had convinced him of the folly of his contemplated adventure, especially in one whose youth was past, and in whose joints the night damp of the Thames might find lodgement for rheumatism.
The key proffered him by the bereaved widower being a large one, he slips his two-foot rule into a side-pocket of his flannel trousers made for it, and deliberately opens his flannel coat, and opens the mouth of a large breast-pocket within it before taking the key to place it in that repository.
All she thought about the key was that if it was the key to the closed garden, and she could find out where the door was, she could perhaps open it and see what was inside the walls, and what had happened to the old rose-trees.
But nowhere in the whole boat could they find a key to fit that lock.
The chambermaid returned, completed her work, locked the door of the dressing-room on the inner side, locked the principal entrance-door on leaving the room, and returned the key to Agnes in the drawing-room.
The key user should forward it to the archive before using the key to encrypt data.
Because it's such a miniscule world--vertical movement of about three-eighths of an inch from the surface of the key to the bottom--key descent may impress us mostly by its insignificance compared to the lateral sweep of hands across the keyboard, but for the pianist the artistry that captivates an audience begins with key depression.