kept


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Related to kept: kept woman

best-kept secret

A certain aspect, fact, location, or activity, usually touristic or commercial in nature, that is or purports to be not well known to the public but deserving of praise or attention. The newspaper called the restaurant the city's best-kept secret. While everyone wants to visit the Ring of Kerry, the Dingle Peninsula is really one of Ireland's best-kept secrets.
See also: secret

keep out of sight

To remain unseen, as by hiding or evasion. The thief kept out of sight while the police searched the nearby neighborhoods. The enemy troops are approaching. Keep out of sight until they're within striking distance.
See also: keep, of, out, sight

keep schtum

To remain silent; to not say anything. (Used especially when by saying something, especially at the wrong time, one would cause trouble or difficulty for him- or herself.) Primarily heard in UK. It's better to just keep schtum when the boss starts flinging accusations than risk further incensing him.
See also: keep

be kept in the loop

To be kept informed about and/or involved in something, such as a plan or project, especially that which involves or pertains to a specific group. We've hired a new intern to help you with the data entry portion of the study, so be sure she's kept in the loop.
See also: kept, loop

keep (someone) on ice

1. To postpone or delay acting on or interacting with a person. I know that journalist has been persistent in getting a comment from us for his story, but we'll just have to keep him on ice until the trial is over.
2. To detain or confine a person in isolation, especially before or during the course of interrogation or torture. The group kept their prisoner on ice for nearly a week before beginning their interrogation. We're keeping the snitch on ice until the boss decides what to do with him.
See also: ice, keep, on

be kept in the dark (about something)

To be kept uninformed (about something); to be excluded from full knowledge or disclosure (of something). The president was kept in the dark about the CIA's assassination attempt so that if things went sour and came to public light, she could claim plausible deniability. I don't fully trust John to keep our plan a secret, so I think it best that he be kept in the dark for now.
See also: dark, kept

keep (something) on the hush

To keep something in a state of secrecy or minimal public knowledge; to allow something to be known only by a select few people. I need to tell you something, but you have to keep it on the hush, OK? I just found out John and Tracey are getting married soon, but I have to keep the news on the hush!
See also: hush, keep, on

keep (something) on the hush-hush

To keep something in a state of secrecy or minimal public knowledge; to allow something to be known only by a select few people. I need to tell you something, but you have to keep it on the hush-hush, OK? I just found out John and Tracey are getting married soon, but I have to keep the news on the hush-hush!
See also: keep, on

keep (someone) in the picture

To keep someone informed or up to date (about something); to keep someone involved in or aware of what is going on. Just make sure you keep the boss in the picture about the status of the project. I want to be kept in the picture when those stolen goods are sold. Don't cut me out of the profit!
See also: keep, picture

keep (someone) on a short leash

To maintain strict or tight control over someone; to not allow someone very much independence or autonomy. Ever since George nearly lost his life savings in a drunken poker match, his husband started keeping him on a short leash. The boss has kept her assistant on a short leash ever since she hired her.
See also: keep, leash, on, short

be kept on a tight leash

To be strictly controlled (by someone); to not be allowed very much independence or autonomy. George has been kept on a tight leash by his husband ever since he gambled away their life savings at a poker match. Everyone feels like they've been kept on a tight leash ever since that new manager took over.
See also: kept, leash, on, tight

be kept on a short leash

To be strictly controlled (by someone); to not be allowed very much independence or autonomy. George has been kept on a short leash by his husband ever since he gambled away their life savings at a poker match. Everyone feels like they've been kept on a short leash ever since that new manager took over.
See also: kept, leash, on, short

a promise made is a promise kept

When one makes a promise, it should be done with the intention of following through. I said I would help you, and I will—because, as far as I'm concerned, a promise made is a promise kept.
See also: kept, made, promise

keep a weather eye open

An instruction to monitor someone or something, often because the person or thing in question may turn out to be dangerous. I think Tom's a thief, so keep a weather eye open around him. I'd keep a weather eye open with this storm that's brewing—we may have to evacuate.
See also: eye, keep, open, weather

keep an eye open

Watch for something carefully; be attentive to something. I'm turning onto your street now, so keep an eye open. Please keep an eye open for any information pertaining to this case.
See also: eye, keep, open

keep one jump ahead

To gain an advantageous position (over another person or an impending occurrence) by being proactive. I'm studying hard to keep one jump ahead of Christine, who is my main competition for valedictorian. I'm going to leave early and take the side streets so I can keep one jump ahead of the traffic.
See also: ahead, jump, keep, one

keep (one) on (one's) toes

To force someone to stay active, alert, and focused on something or someone. Having two kids under age five sure keeps me on my toes!
See also: keep, on, toe

keep (one's) head below the parapet

To hide or remain inconspicuous in an attempt to avoid trouble or danger. I wouldn't say anything right now—just keep your head below the parapet for the time being.
See also: below, head, keep, parapet

keep (one) dangling

To maintain some form of relationship with someone without revealing one's true feelings or intentions; to keep someone in an uncertain position. If you don't want to marry him, then you have to tell him that—you can't keep him dangling any longer! A: "I'm never going to get a promotion, am I?" B: "With the way the boss keeps you dangling, I doubt it."
See also: keep

keep under cover

1. Literally, to stay beneath a shelter of some kind, typically to avoid inclement weather. A: "How did you stay so dry in this downpour?" B: "I've been keeping under cover here, like we were supposed to!"
2. To hide something (often one's true identity or motives) from others. I need to keep under cover on this assignment so no one learns that I'm a spy.
See also: cover, keep

kept man

A man who does not work and receives money and provisions from his romantic partner. For years, Stella has had a much younger kept man that she brings to all the big events in the city.
See also: kept, man

kept woman

A woman who does not work and receives money and provisions from her romantic partner. She never had any desire to be a kept woman so she worked hard to pursue her career.
See also: kept, woman

a kept man/woman

  (humorous)
someone who does not work and who is given money and a place to live by the person who they are having a sexual relationship with She was determined to find work and not become a kept woman like her sister.
See also: kept, man
References in classic literature ?
In the meantime Kama kept the pace, never grumbling, never shirking.
Pigeons can be mated for life, and this is a great convenience to the fancier, for thus many races may be kept true, though mingled in the same aviary; and this circumstance must have largely favoured the improvement and formation of new breeds.
Also, large deep baskets were the receivers of my corn, which I always rubbed out as soon as it was dry and cured, and kept it in great baskets.
I had, as is observed in the third year of my being here, kept a young kid, and bred her up tame, and I was in hopes of getting a he-goat; but I could not by any means bring it to pass, till my kid grew an old goat; and as I could never find in my heart to kill her, she died at last of mere age.
The ladies also gave me clothes frequently of their own or their children's; some stockings, some petticoats, some gowns, some one thing, some another, and these my old woman managed for me like a mere mother, and kept them for me, obliged me to mend them, and turn them and twist them to the best advantage, for she was a rare housewife.
I was then in a sad condition indeed, for as there is no great bustle in putting an end to a poor body's family when once they are carried to the grave, so the poor good woman being buried, the parish children she kept were immediately removed by the church-wardens; the school was at an end, and the children of it had no more to do but just stay at home till they were sent somewhere else; and as for what she left, her daughter, a married woman with six or seven children, came and swept it all away at once, and removing the goods, they had no more to say to me than to jest with me, and tell me that the little gentlewoman might set up for herself if she pleased.
Lastly,' she continued, 'for I am at the end of these things, and I will say no more of them, and you shall say no more of them, and all that remains will be to determine whether the knowledge of them can be kept among us who are here present; lastly, when I suppressed that paper, with the knowledge of Arthur's father--'
I say, when I suppressed that paper, I made no effort to destroy it, but kept it by me, here in this house, many years.
The little singing-bird that never was fledged, was long kept in a cage by a guardian of your appointing, well enough known to our old intriguer here.
I think I see your pride carrying it out, with a chance of being suspected of having kept it by you.
I thought I might as well keep them to myself as have them swallowed up alive too; so I kept them in a box, looking over them when I felt in the humour.
Only promise me, that, if it's the poor thing that's kept here secretly, you'll let me take charge of her and be her nurse.
All these proceedings naturally made the child more watchful and suspicious, and she soon observed that whenever they halted to perform outside a village alehouse or other place, Mr Codlin while he went through his share of the entertainments kept his eye steadily upon her and the old man, or with a show of great friendship and consideration invited the latter to lean upon his arm, and so held him tight until the representation was over and they again went forward.
As many of the children as could be kept within bounds, were stowed away, with all the other signs of dirt and poverty, among the donkeys, carts, and horses; and as many as could not be thus disposed of ran in and out in all intricate spots, crept between people's legs and carriage wheels, and came forth unharmed from under horses' hoofs.
in the "General Information" section, state that "tax returns, worksheets and forms should be kept for three years, but records relating to property should be kept longer insofar as they are relevant for determining basis.