jury


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the jury is out

A decision has not yet been made. A: "Are we proceeding with the ad campaign?" B: "The jury is out on that. We want to bring in a few more focus groups."
See also: jury, out

jury is still out (on someone or something)

Fig. a decision has not been reached on someone or something; the people making the decision on someone or something have not yet decided. The jury is still out on Jane. We don't know what we are going to do about her. The jury is still out on the question of building a new parking lot.
See also: jury, out, still

jury is still out, the

No decision has been made; the public's opinion is not known. For example, As for a possible merger, the jury is still out, or The jury is still out on the new spring fashions. This expression alludes to the jury that decides a legal case. [Colloquial; mid-1900s]
See also: jury, still

the jury is out

or

the jury is still out

COMMON If you say that the jury is out or the jury is still out on a particular subject, you mean that people have not yet formed an opinion about it or reached a decision. The jury's still out on what are the long-term effects of air pollution. Specialists haven't been able to make up their minds whether hair dye is safe or not. `The jury is still out,' says Dr Venitt firmly. Note: This refers to the time when the jury in a court case retires from the court room to decide on a verdict.
See also: jury, out

the jury is out

a decision has not yet been reached on a controversial subject.
1998 New Scientist The jury is still out, but it looks as if there are no significant changes in the cosmic dust flux during past climate cycles.
See also: jury, out

the jury is/are (still) ˈout (on something)

people have not yet decided if something is good or bad: No one knows whether the government’s housing policy is popular or not. The jury is still out on that until the next election.Was he a good leader? The jury is still out on that question.
The jury is a group of members of the public who listen to the facts of a case in a court of law and decide whether or not a person is guilty of a crime. They leave the courtroom to discuss the case and make their decision in secret.
See also: jury, out
References in classic literature ?
Skimpin proceeded to 'open the case'; and the case appeared to have very little inside it when he had opened it, for he kept such particulars as he knew, completely to himself, and sat down, after a lapse of three minutes, leaving the jury in precisely the same advanced stage of wisdom as they were in before.
Serjeant Buzfuz then rose with all the majesty and dignity which the grave nature of the proceedings demanded, and having whispered to Dodson, and conferred briefly with Fogg, pulled his gown over his shoulders, settled his wig, and addressed the jury.
Counsel usually begin in this way, because it puts the jury on the very best terms with themselves, and makes them think what sharp fellows they must be.
You have heard from my learned friend, gentlemen,' continued Serjeant Buzfuz, well knowing that, from the learned friend alluded to, the gentlemen of the jury had heard just nothing at all--'you have heard from my learned friend, gentlemen, that this is an action for a breach of promise of marriage, in which the damages are laid at #1,500.
It began to be rumoured that the jury would be out a long while.
Van der School arose to address the jury, he commenced by saying:
Vain der School favored the jury with an abridgment of the testimony, recounted in such a manner as utterly to confuse the faculties of his worthy listeners.
As before, the jury did not leave their box; but, after a consultation of some little time, their foreman arose, and pronounced the prisoner Guilty.
The judges seemed to have anticipated this sentiment, for a consultation was passing among them also, during the deliberation of the jury, and the preparatory movements of the “bench” announced the coming sentence.
I ask the jury to compare them with the finger marks of the accused upon the windowpanes, and tell the court if they are the same.
Again the jury made minute examinations, and again reported:
I will ask the jury to take these large pantograph facsimilies of A's marked five months and seven months.
The magic name of Merdle,' said Bar, with the jury droop, 'no doubt will suffice for all.
Anyway, all this tomfoolery is a great waste of time," continued the lady, glancing up and down the jury disparagingly.
He took an old envelope out of his pocket, and wrote his name on it, handing it to the jury.