jury


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Related to jury: jury duty, Jury nullification, hung jury, Jury selection

the jury is out

A decision has not yet been made. A: "Are we proceeding with the ad campaign?" B: "The jury is out on that. We want to bring in a few more focus groups."
See also: jury, out

jury is still out (on someone or something)

Fig. a decision has not been reached on someone or something; the people making the decision on someone or something have not yet decided. The jury is still out on Jane. We don't know what we are going to do about her. The jury is still out on the question of building a new parking lot.
See also: jury, out, still

jury is still out, the

No decision has been made; the public's opinion is not known. For example, As for a possible merger, the jury is still out, or The jury is still out on the new spring fashions. This expression alludes to the jury that decides a legal case. [Colloquial; mid-1900s]
See also: jury, still

the jury is out

or

the jury is still out

COMMON If you say that the jury is out or the jury is still out on a particular subject, you mean that people have not yet formed an opinion about it or reached a decision. The jury's still out on what are the long-term effects of air pollution. Specialists haven't been able to make up their minds whether hair dye is safe or not. `The jury is still out,' says Dr Venitt firmly. Note: This refers to the time when the jury in a court case retires from the court room to decide on a verdict.
See also: jury, out

the jury is out

a decision has not yet been reached on a controversial subject.
1998 New Scientist The jury is still out, but it looks as if there are no significant changes in the cosmic dust flux during past climate cycles.
See also: jury, out

the jury is/are (still) ˈout (on something)

people have not yet decided if something is good or bad: No one knows whether the government’s housing policy is popular or not. The jury is still out on that until the next election.Was he a good leader? The jury is still out on that question.
The jury is a group of members of the public who listen to the facts of a case in a court of law and decide whether or not a person is guilty of a crime. They leave the courtroom to discuss the case and make their decision in secret.
See also: jury, out
References in classic literature ?
He took an old envelope out of his pocket, and wrote his name on it, handing it to the jury.
If it's near dinner-time, the foreman takes out his watch when the jury has retired, and says, "Dear me, gentlemen, ten minutes to five, I declare
Serjeant Buzfuz prayed a TALES; the gentleman in black then proceeded to press into the special jury, two of the common jurymen; and a greengrocer and a chemist were caught directly.
Serjeant Buzfuz rubbed his eyes very hard with a large white handkerchief, and gave an appealing look towards the jury, while the judge was visibly affected, and several of the beholders tried to cough down their emotion.
Cluppins, after a careful survey of Master Bardell's buttons and the button-holes to which they severally belonged, placed him on the floor of the court in front of his mother--a commanding position in which he could not fail to awaken the full commiseration and sympathy of both judge and jury.
Skimpin proceeded to 'open the case'; and the case appeared to have very little inside it when he had opened it, for he kept such particulars as he knew, completely to himself, and sat down, after a lapse of three minutes, leaving the jury in precisely the same advanced stage of wisdom as they were in before.
Serjeant Buzfuz then rose with all the majesty and dignity which the grave nature of the proceedings demanded, and having whispered to Dodson, and conferred briefly with Fogg, pulled his gown over his shoulders, settled his wig, and addressed the jury.
Counsel usually begin in this way, because it puts the jury on the very best terms with themselves, and makes them think what sharp fellows they must be.
You have heard from my learned friend, gentlemen,' continued Serjeant Buzfuz, well knowing that, from the learned friend alluded to, the gentlemen of the jury had heard just nothing at all--'you have heard from my learned friend, gentlemen, that this is an action for a breach of promise of marriage, in which the damages are laid at #1,500.
Here Serjeant Buzfuz paused, while several gentlemen of the jury took a note of the document.
I entreat the attention of the jury to the wording of this document--"Apartments furnished for a single gentleman"
Justice Stareleigh, who immediately wrote down something with a pen without any ink in it, and looked unusually profound, to impress the jury with the belief that he always thought most deeply with his eyes shut.
Serjeant Buzfuz paused in this place, to see whether the jury smiled at his joke; but as nobody took it but the greengrocer, whose sensitiveness on the subject was very probably occasioned by his having subjected a chaise-cart to the process in question on that identical morning, the learned Serjeant considered it advisable to undergo a slight relapse into the dismals before he concluded.
The gentleman who was against him had to speak first, and being in dreadfully good spirits (for he had, in the last trial, very nearly procured the acquittal of a young gentleman who had had the misfortune to murder his father) he spoke up, you may be sure; telling the jury that if they acquitted this prisoner they must expect to suffer no less pangs and agonies than he had told the other jury they would certainly undergo if they convicted that prisoner.
Judge, jury and spectators have visions of his lounging about, with an ill-looking, large-whiskered, dissolute young fellow of six feet high.